Postgraduate Diploma in Communication, Information Gathering, Analysis, Report Writing: in Dubai KL London Abuja Accra Colombo Online

Postgraduate Diploma Programme number 043, Communication, Information Gathering, Analysis and Report Writing, Intensive Full-Time {3 Months (5 Days or 30 Credit Hours Per Week)} Per Week)}, Leading to Communication and Information Management. Course contents include: Spelling Unusual Words, Vowels and Consonants, The Silent Vowels, The Peculiars, Speech Organisation – Nouns – Common nouns, Proper nouns, ‘Noun in a position’, Countable,  Uncountable, Pronouns –  Types of Pronouns,

 

Relative pronoun, Personal pronoun, Indefinite pronoun, Demonstrative pronoun, Reflexive pronoun, Interrogative pronoun, Verbs, Transitive And Intransitive Verbs, Adjectives, Adverbs, Prepositions, Exclamations Or Interjections, Conjunction, Gerunds, The superlatives, Using Tense appropriately, Present Tense, Past Tense, Simple Present Tense, Present Perfect Tense, Pluperfect or Past Perfect Tense, Future tense, Fundamentals of Reported Speech, Subjects and Objects, Relating number of verb to number of subject or object, Clauses, Main clauses, Subsidiary clauses, Types of clauses, Defining clauses, Non-defining clauses,

 

Noun clauses, Adjectival clauses, Adverbial clauses, Instrument Design, Information Gathering, Analysis and Presentation, Sources of Information, Secondary Sources of Information, Primary Sources of Information, Combining Primary and Secondary Sources of Information, Selecting appropriate background information, Choosing The Methodology for collecting information, Qualitative Approaches to collecting information, Quantitative Approaches to collecting information, Combining or ‘Triangulating’ The Methods of collecting information, Data gathering Techniques,  Surveys, Participant Observation, Conversation Analysis, Documentary Analysis, Focus Groups, Interviews, Questionnaires, Structuring interview and questionnaire items,

 

Closed-ended questions, Open-ended questions, Non-forced-choice closed ended questions, Sampling As An Important Element of gathering information, The Sampling Frame, Sampling Techniques, Convenience Or Non-random Samples, Quota Sample, Systematic Sample, Probability Or Random Samples, Simple Random Sample, Stratified Sampling, Multi-stage Sampling, Interview Or Questionnaire?, Using Unstructured Questions, Using Open-ended Questions, Designing Closed-ended Questions, Avoiding Forced-choice, Data Analysis, Instruments of Analysis,

 

Using a ‘Tally System’, Using SPSS Package – Licensing permitting, Using Excel Package Data Interpretation, Making Sense of The Information gathered and analysed, Identifying ‘Trends’ & ‘Patterns’ in Information, Arriving At Conclusions, Reporting The Findings, Reporting Styles, Using The Evidence available, Choosing reporting style to match the type of report or information being presented, Generating Graphs & Charts From Tables, Using Microsoft Excel to create graphs and charts, Monitoring & Continuous Evaluation, The Interim Reports, The final Report, Formal Reports, The Abstract, Establishing The Term of reference, The Executive Summary, Choosing prefacing summaries The Introduction, The Background, Styles of Report Writing, Using Visual presentation to enhance the effectiveness of reports, Using evidence from information gathered to support claims made in reports.

Communication, Information Gathering, Analysis and Report Writing

Programme for

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Comm

 Programme Co-ordinator:

Prof. Dr. R. B. Crawford is Programme Coordinator. He is the Director of HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute, A Postgraduate-Only Institution. He has the following Qualifications and Affiliations:

Doctor of Philosophy {(PhD) {University College London (UCL) - University of London)};

MEd Management (University of Bath);

Postgraduate (Advanced) Diploma Science Teacher Ed. (University of Bristol);

Postgraduate Certificate in Information Systems (University of West London, formerly Thames Valley University);

Diploma in Doctoral Research Supervision, (University of Wolverhampton);

Teaching Certificate;

Fellow of the Institute of Management Specialists;

Human Resources Specialist, of the Institute of Management Specialists;

Member of the Asian Academy of Management (MAAM);

Member of the International Society of Gesture Studies (MISGS);

Member of the Standing Council for Organisational Symbolism (MSCOS);

Member of ResearchGate;

Executive Member of Academy of Management (AOM). There, his contribution incorporates the judging of competitions, review of journal articles, and guiding the development of conference papers. He also contributes to the Disciplines of:

Human Resources;

Organization and Management Theory;

Organization Development and Change;

Research Methods;

Conflict Management;

Organizational Behavior;

Management Consulting;

Gender & Diversity in Organizations; and

Critical Management Studies.

Professor Dr. Crawford has been an Academic in the following UK Universities:

University of London (Royal Holloway), as Research Tutor;

University of Greenwich (Business School), as Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor), in Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management;

University of Wolverhampton, (Wolverhampton Business School), as Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor), in Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management.

London Southbank University (Business School), as Lecturer and Unit Leader.

His responsibilities in these roles included:

Doctoral Research Supervisor;

Admissions Tutor;

Postgraduate and Undergraduate Dissertation Supervisor;

Programme Leader;

Personal Tutor.

 

Duration:

Intensive Full-Time {3 Months (5 Days or 30 credit Hours Per Week)}

 

Cost:                        

£45,000.00 Per Delegate 

 

The programme cost does not include living accommodation. However, students and delegates are treated to the following:

*        Free Continuous snacks throughout the Event Days;  

*        Free Hot Lunch on Event Days;                           

*        Free City Tour;             

*        Free Stationery;                               

*        Free On-site Internet Access;

*       HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s   Diploma – Postgraduate; or

*       Certificate of Attendance and Participation – if unsuccessful on resit.

 

HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Complimentary Products include:

 

*       HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Leather Conference Folder;

*       HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Leather Conference Ring Binder/ Writing Pad;

*       HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Key Ring/ Chain;

*       HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Leather Conference (Computer – Phone) Bag – Black or Brown;

*       HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s 8GB USB Flash Memory Drive, with Course/ Programme Material;

*       HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Metal Pen;

*       HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Polo Shirt.

 

Location:  Central London and International Locations

 

 The methodology that will be employed in the delivery of the proposed training includes:

  • Discussion groups,

  • Group and individual investigation,

  • Simulations

  • Individual consultation

  • DVD/Video Case Analysis

  • Text Case Analysis

  • Documentary Analysis

  • Formal Presentation

  • Assessment

  • Assessment, towards the Postgraduate Diploma, Communication and Information Management will be both in-session and out of session, on a cumulative and continuous basis, to facilitate the retaking of assessable Blocks, within the allocated time. Participants will be advised, at the start of the programme, when and what form the assessment will take.

THE PROGRAMME

 

 

Block # 1

Block Title

Credit Value

Duration

 

Use of English

3

90 Hours

Objectives

Contents & Concepts

By the end of the specified Learning and development activities, delegates will be able to:

  • Demonstrate their ability to spell unusual words

  • Demonstrate their Mastery of the English ‘Peculiars’

  • Identify words with silent consonants, reflecting this factor in their spelling

  • Demonstrate their ability to identify words with silent consonants, reflecting this factor in their spelling

  • Demonstrate their ability to recall the different parts of speech, in the English Language;

  • Demonstrate their knowledge of the function of the different parts of speech, generally

  • Demonstrate their knowledge of the function of the different parts of speech, understanding

  • Demonstrate their ability to differentiate between ‘countables’ and ‘uncountables’ and the appropriate ways of managing them in context.

  • Distinguish between common and proper nouns

  • Use the different parts of speech in sentences, their demonstrating their ability to use them effectively in context

  • Exhibit their understanding of how the different types of pronouns are to be used in different contexts

  • Indicate how transitive and intransitive verbs are to be used in written and spoken contexts

  • Construct sentences and paragraphs using gerunds, as distinct form other aspects and contexts of ‘Use of English’

  • Use comparatives and superlatives, effectively, demonstrating how to appropriately use them in written and spoken contexts.

  • Analyse sentences, picking out main and subordinate clauses

  • Construct sentences, incorporating noun clauses

  • Demonstrate their ability to construct sentences incorporating noun clauses

  • Analyse sentences, demonstrating their knowledge of the difference between nouns, and adverbial and adjectival clauses.

  • Tell the function of clauses in sentences.

  • Spelling Unusual Words

  • Vowels and Consonants;

  • The Silent Vowels;

  • The Peculiars;

  • Speech Organisation –

  • Nouns –

  • Common nouns,

  • Proper nouns,

  • ‘Noun in a position’,

  • Countables,

  • Uncountables;

  • Pronouns –

  • Types of Pronouns

  • Relative pronoun

  • Personal pronoun

  • Indefinite pronoun  

  • Demonstrative pronoun 

  • Reflexive pronoun    

  • Interrogative pronoun

  • Verbs –

  • Transitive And Intransitive Verbs;

  • Adjectives;

  • Adverbs;

  • Prepositions;

  • Exclamations Or Interjections

  • Conjunction

  • Gerunds

  • The superlatives

  • Using Tense appropriately –

  • Present Tense;

  • Past Tense;

  • Simple Present Tense

  • Present Perfect Tense;

  • Pluperfect or Past Perfect Tense;

  • Future tense;

  • Fundamentals of Reported Speech

  • Subjects and Objects         

  • Relating number of verb to number of subject or object

  • Clauses

  • Main clauses

  • Subsidiary clauses

  • Types of clauses –

  • Defining clauses

  • Non-defining clauses

  • Noun clauses

  • Adjectival clauses

  • Adverbial clauses

 

 

Block #2

Block Title

Credit Value

Duration

 

Information Gathering, Processing and Presentation

2

60 Hours

Objectives

Contents & Concepts

By the conclusion of the specified learning activities, participants will be able to:

  • Distinguish between data and information

  • Assess the value of secondary sources of information as a prelude to the presentation of primary information

  • Choose the most appropriate data elicitation techniques, in relation to the sampling frame, sampling unit, sample size & time span, among other factors.

  • Advise others of the situations in which participant observation, conversation analysis, documentary analysis, focus groups, interviews & questionnaires, respectively, are appropriate.

  • Design interview & questionnaire schedules that will elicit information appropriate to the objectives of the report

  • Design structured & unstructured questions, determining the conditions under which they should be used

  • Design questionnaires & interview schedules, with a mixture of open-ended & closed-ended items, avoiding forced-choice in the latter

  • Employ the most appropriate data analysis techniques, based on the type & volume of data available

  • Use SPSS (subject to licence) and, or, Excel software packages in analysing data

  • Use Microsoft Excel to make necessary calculations

  • Identifying ‘trends’ & ‘patterns’ in information, in an effort to arrive at the appropriate conclusions

  • Distinguish between summary and conclusions

  • Produce effective reports, adhering to conventional styles, presenting evidence from the data, & exploiting visual representations

  • Design an investigation, taking pertinent factors into account

  • Manage an investigation, from inception and design to reporting

  • Demonstrate their ability to work collaboratively in:

  • Designing an investigation

  • Eliciting data,

  • Analysing data

  • Interpreting Data

  • Presenting Information

 

 

Instrument Design, Information Gathering, Analysis and Presentation:

  •       Sources of Information

  •       Secondary Sources of Information

  •       Primary Sources of Information

  •       Combining Primary and Secondary Sources of Information

  •       Selecting appropriate background information

  •       Choosing The Methodology for collecting information

  •       Qualitative Approaches to collecting information

  •       Quantitative Approaches to collecting information

  •       Combining or ‘Triangulating’ The Methods of collecting information

  •       Data gathering Techniques

  •       Surveys

  •       Participant Observation

  •       Conversation Analysis

  •       Documentary Analysis

  •       Focus Groups

  •       Interviews

  •       Questionnaires

  •       Structuring interview and questionnaire items

  •       Closed-ended questions

  •       Open-ended questions

  •       Non-forced-choice closed ended questions

  •       Sampling As An Important Element of gathering information

  •       The Sampling Frame

  •       Sampling Techniques

  •       Convenience Or Non-random Samples

  •       Quota Sample

  • Systematic Sample

  • Probability Or Random Samples

  • Simple Random Sample

  • Stratified Sampling

  • Multi-stage Sampling

  • Interview Or Questionnaire?

  • Using Unstructured Questions

  • Using Open-ended Questions

  • Designing Closed-ended Questions

  • Avoiding Forced-choice

  • Data Analysis

  • Instruments of Analysis

  • Using a ‘Tally System’

  • Using SPSS Package – Licensing permitting

  • Using Excel Package

  • Data Interpretation

  • Making Sense of The Information gathered and analysed

  • Identifying ‘Trends’ & ‘Patterns’ in Information

  • Arriving At Conclusions

  • Reporting The Findings

  • Reporting Styles

  • Using The Evidence available

  • Choosing reporting style to match the type of report or information being presented

  • Generating Graphs & Charts From Tables

  • Using Microsoft Excel to create graphs and charts

  • Monitoring & Continuous Evaluation

  • The Interim Reports

  • The final Report

  • Formal Reports

  • The Abstract

  • Establishing The Terms of reference

  • The Executive Summary

  • Choosing prefacing summaries

  • The Introduction

  • The Background

  • Styles of Report Writing;

  • Using Visual presentation to enhance the effectiveness of reports

  • Using evidence from information gathered to support claims made in reports

 

 

 

 

Block #3

Block Title

Credit Value

Duration

 

Multimedia (Oral-Visual) Presentation

1

30 Hours

Objectives

Contents & Concepts

By the conclusion of the specified learning activities, participants will be able to:

  • ‘Explicitly demonstrate’ that they took the necessary steps in the preparation for their oral-visual presentation

  • Prepare and deliver electronic presentations

  • Demonstrate their understanding of the importance of the introduction – in oral-visual presentations

  • Demonstrate effective verbal and non-verbal presentation skills, during the delivery of their oral-visual presentations

  • Demonstrate their ability to select the information that is relevant to the particular issues being presented, omitting the irrelevant aspects

  • Exhibit their ability to select the most appropriate PowerPoint template, in line with the type of presentation they intend to deliver

  • Set their PowerPoint presentation slides to automatic run, timing it to coincide with their allocated time

  • Programme their presentations to provide ‘dim effect’, thereby enhancing the readability and psychological effect of the information they present

  • Preparing For The presentation

  • Electronic Presentations

  • The Presentation

  • The Introduction To Your Presentation

  • Avoiding Stage-fright

  • Eye Contact, Posture & Other Forms Of Body Language

  • Verbal Communication –

  • Written Communication

  • Oral communication - audibility, Intonation, Etc.

  • Improving The Relevance Of Information presented

  • Addressing Questions

  • Designing PowerPoint Presentations

  • Choosing PowerPoint Background

  • Using PowerPoint Templates

  • Using sound and animation, appropriately

  • Adding automatic run

  • Timing the presentation for automatic run

  • Enhancing presentations with ‘Dim’ effect.

  • Choosing the appropriate ‘Dim effect’

 

Block #3

Block Title

Credit Value

Duration

 

Taxonomy and Multimedia (Oral-Visual) Presentation

1

30 Hours

Taxonomy of Educational Objectives

Objectives

Contents & Concepts

By the end of the specified Learning and development activities, delegates will be able to:

  • Demonstrate their understanding of the different levels of learning

  • Indicate the level of learning that relates to each ‘occupational activity’,

  • Determine the level of information processing that is associated with each level of learning,

  • Levels of Learning –

  • Simple Recall;

  • Comprehension or Analysis;

  • Application;

  • Problem-Solving;

  • Synthesis

 

 

Minutes and Minute-Taking

Objectives

Contents & Concepts

By the conclusion of the specified learning activities, participants will be able to:

  • Illustrate the importance of meetings in an organisational context

  • Demonstrate the use of different minute-taking techniques

  • Make decisions regarding the appropriateness of particular minute-taking techniques,

  • Make decisions regarding the appropriateness of particular minute reporting styles

  • Determine when verbatim in minute reporting is important and appropriate

  • Demonstrate their ability to use mind-mapping technique to record minutes.

  • Preparing for the meeting

  • Preparing to Take the minutes;

  • The significance of minutes;

  • Minutes as a record of events;

  • Meetings in a historical perspective;

  • Techniques of minute-taking;

  • Recording styles;

  • Preparation and Presentation of minutes;

  • The verbatim – when is it appropriate;

  • Taking note of motions;

  • Taking note of result of motions;

  • Noting Action Points;

  • Noting assigners and assignees of action;

  • Noting timescales and deadlines;

  • Recording amendments to minutes; Seeking clarification

  • Mind-mapping as a minute-taking technique.

 

 

Block #4

Block Title

Credit Value

Duration

Course # 53

Effective Time Management

1

30 Hours

Block 4 - Part 1

INTRODUCTION TO TIME MANAGEMENT

Block Objectives:

Contents, Concepts and Issues

By the conclusion of the specified Learning, Reinforcement, Consolidation and Development Activities, Delegates will be able to:

  • Principles of Time Management

  • Time Management Defined

  • Time in an Organisational Wide Context: Acting in Time

  • The Cost of Time

  • Time Management Tools

  • Maximising Personal Effectiveness

  • Busy vs. Productive

  • Time Wasters/Time Robbers/Time Stealers/Time Bandits

  • Managing Time Wasters/Time Robbers/Time Stealers/Time Bandits

  • Combating Procrastination

  • Diffusing the Impact of Others

  • Handling Interruptions Constructively

  • Asserting Yourself Politely and Calmly

  • Conquering Overcommitment ( Learn to say, “No”)

  • Determine how efficient time management increases work effectiveness and productivity.

  • Develop a personal approach in using your time in the most productive way

  • Implement techniques for minimising disruptions.

  • Understand the underlying principles of “time” in an organisational wide context

  • Appreciate the importance of time management

  • Know the difference between being “busy” and “productive”

  • Identify time wasters and adopt strategies for eliminating them

  • Make use of the different time management tools to increase their work effectiveness and productivity.

  • Develop ways to maximise their personal effectiveness.

  • Understand the difference between important and urgent activities/works.

  • Learn how to diffuse the impact of others.

  • Adopt appropriate strategies for dealing with interruptions.

  • Learn how to handle interruptions constructively.

  • Learn how assert themselves politely and calmly.

  • Know how to refuse unreasonable requests in the proper manner.

 

 

 

Block 4 -  PART 2

CONTEXTUALISING TIME MANAGEMENT

Block Objectives:

Contents, Concepts and Issues

  • By the conclusion of the specified Learning, Reinforcement, Consolidation and Development Activities, Delegates will be able to:

  • Contextualising Time Management

  •  

  • The Four D’s of Time Management

  • Do

  • Delegate

  • Tasks Which Should Be Delegated

  • Effective Delegation Techniques

  • How to Delegate

  • Dump

  • Defer

  • Managing Multiple Task and Deadlines

  • Combating Work Related Stress

  • Balancing Personal and Professional Life

  • Avoiding Time Crunches

  • Handling Unexpected Job Emergencies

  • Human Multitasking

  • Benefits of Effective Time Management

  • Effects of Poor Time Management

  •  

  •  

  • Time Management Theories

  •  

  • Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

  • The Pickle Jar Theory

  • Pareto Principle or 80/20 Rule

  • Eisenhower Method

  • POSEC Method

 

  • Specify and explain the four D’s in time management.

  • Use effective delegation techniques at the workplace.

  • Decide which items can be delegated

  • Adopt effective delegation techniques.

  • Know how to properly delegate task.

  • Relate the concept of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs with effective time management.

  • Explain the pickle jar theory

  • Apply the Pareto Principle (80/20 rule) to time management issues.

  • Explain the concept of Eisenhower method.

  • Discuss POSEC Method in relation to time management.

  • Recognise the variety of causes of procrastination and apply relevant techniques to overcome them.

  • Identify time bandits and devise strategies for dealing with them.

  • Understand the concept of multitasking.

  • Suggest ways to manage multiple tasks.

  • Meet tight deadlines with time to spare.

  • Beat work related stress.

  • Gain a balance between professional goals and personal time.

  • Devise ways to avoiding time crunches.

  • Formulate strategies in handling unexpected job emergencies.

  • Enumerate the benefits of effective time management.

  • Specify the effects of poor time management.

  •  

 

 

Block 4-  PART 3

SETTING GOALS/OBJECTIVES, PLANNING AND GETTING ORGANISED

Block Objectives:

Contents, Concepts and Issues

By the conclusion of the specified Learning, Reinforcement, Consolidation and Development Activities, Delegates will be able to:

  • Setting Goals and Objectives

  • What You Want to Achieve

  • Importance of Goal

  • Setting Realistic Goals Through SMART Method

  • Techniques for Setting and Achieving Goals

  •  

  • Planning

  • Management and Planning Tools

  • Using a Planner

  • Developing Action Plan

  •  

  •  

  • Getting Organised

  • Organising Your Workspace, Files and Folders

  • E-mail, Task and Calendar Managing

  • Information Flow and Retrieval Process

  • Information Overload

  • Schedule Management

  • Scheduling to Create Work/Life Balance

  • Creating Dynamic “To-Do List”

  • Reducing Mental Clutter

  • The Batching Technique 

  • Utilise Time Gaps

  • Effective Follow-up System

  • Developing Time Management Habit

 

  • Ascertain their respective goals/objectives.

  • Realise the importance of goals.

  • Develop useful techniques for setting and achieving goals.

  • Determine how goal setting can lead to proper time management.

  • Set realistic goals through SMART method.

  • Identify their professional goals and personal time.

  • Name the different planning tools.

  • Devise their personal planner.

  • Develop your own individualised plan of action.to maximise their use of time.

  • Use practical techniques for organising work.

  • Handle e-mails, task and calendar systematically.

  • Manage information flow and retrieval process.

  • Deal with information overload.

  • Devise an organized and systematic schedule and handle it properly.

  • Develop their personal “To-Do List.”

  • Explain the concept of batching technique and its relationship to time management.

  • Learn how to utilize their gap times.

  • Manage projects in a systematic way.

  • Adopt an effective follow-up system in the workplace.

  • Develop and maintain a good time management habit.

 

 

 

Block 4 -  PART 4

SCHEDULING, PRIORITISING AND TIME MANAGEMENT APPLICATION

Block Objectives:

Contents, Concepts and Issues

By the conclusion of the specified Learning, Reinforcement, Consolidation and Development Activities, Delegates will be able to:

  • Scheduling

  • Effective Scheduling

  • Steps in Scheduling

  • Prioritising

  • The Prioritisation Grid

  • Important vs. Urgent

  • Time Management Matrix (Covey’s Four Quadrant Matrix)

  • To-Do List

  • ABC123 Prioritised Planning

  • Decision Matrix

  •  Time Management and Manager

  •  How Most Managers Apportioned Their Time

  • Time Management Tips for Managers

  • Effective Resource Management

  • Workload Analysis

  • Managing Workload

  • Managing Disorganised Staffs

 

  • Plan to make the best use of the time available through the art of effective scheduling.

  • Learn the step-by-step process in making effective schedule.

  • Understand the underlying concept of the prioritisation grid.

  • Prioritise ‘urgent’ and ‘important’ activities.

  • Explain the time management matrix.

  • Develop their personal ABC123 prioritised planning.

  • Learn how to prioritise using decision matrices.

  • Learn how to maintain their responsibility.

  • Know how most managers apportioned their time.

  • Enumerate the different time management tips for managers.

  • Manage resources more efficiently.

  • Conduct an efficient workload analysis.

  • Learn how to manage their workloads more effectively.

  • Ascertain how to work with disorganised colleagues.

  • Specify and explain the four D’s in time management.

  • Use effective delegation techniques at the workplace.

  • Decide which items can be delegated

  • Adopt effective delegation techniques.

  • Know how to properly delegate task.

 

 

 

Block 4 -  PART 5

ACHIEVING EFFECTIVE TIME MANAGEMENT THROUGH PROPER MEETING MANAGEMENT

Block Objectives:

Contents, Concepts and Issues

By the conclusion of the specified Learning, Reinforcement, Consolidation and Development Activities, Delegates will be able to:

  • Meeting Management

  •  Creating an Effective Agenda

  • Importance of Agenda

  • Steps For Productive and Effective Meeting

  • Groupthink

  • Teamthink

  • Reducing Time Spent on Meeting

  • Meeting Menaces

  • The Waffler

  • The Turf Warrior

  • The Assassin

  • The Dominator

  • The Interrupter

  • Meeting Mismanagement

  •  Trading Game Scenario

 

 

 

 

  • Create an effective agenda that will keep the meeting on the track

  • Realise the importance of agenda

  • Specify the steps for running productive and effective meeting

  • Distinguish groupthink from teamthink

  • Reduce time spent in meetings yet contribute more effectively

  • Identify the different meeting menaces and learn how to deal with them

  • Ascertain the possible causes and effects of meeting mismanagement

  • Solve problems through the trading game scenario.

 

 

Block #5

Block Title

Credit Value

Duration

Course # 50

 

1

30 Hours

Course Objectives

By the end to this presentation and its related activities, you will be able to:

  • Distinguish between groups and mere aggregations

  • Suggest the difference in interpretation of groups and teams

  • Demonstrate your understanding of the social and psychological relevance of the stages of formation of a group

  • Distinguish between task forces, committees, command groups and boards

  •  

  • Apply group dynamics to organisational settings

  • Suggest ways of improving group morale, while enhancing their effectiveness

  •  

  •  

  • Demonstrate a heightened understanding of the type and permanence of the leadership of a team

  • Explain the occasions in which a situational leader is likely to emerge

  • Demonstrate a high level of understanding of a team attempts to replace a situational leader, to enhance stability, acceptability or renewed or clarified mission or objectives

  • Determine why a temporary team is likely to be more problematic to lead than a permanent team

  • Explain why a team’s disbandment might have a negative psychological effect on members and the team leader

  •  Explain the bases for the feeling of  ‘Togetherness’ or ‘Awareness’ IN An Aggregation

  • Demonstrate their understanding of the theoretical and practice bases of Team Dynamics

  • Explain the Team Typological Bases

  • Distinguish between command teams, boards, committees and task forces

  • Provide examples of command teams, highlighting the situations in which a leader might belong to two Command Teams

  • Distinguish between Temporary Committees and Standing Committees

  • Order the team formation stages, explaining the psychological issues that beset them and relate them to organisational functioning

  • Demonstrate their ability to deal with the psychological effect of disbandment

  • Detect Dysfunctional Behaviours

  • Address the salient issues associated with Dysfunctional Behaviours

  • Provide an individually synthesized proposal for dealing with aggressiveness

  • Indicate how they would handle blocking, effectively 

  • Propose an effective way of dealing with interfering behaviour

  • Demonstrate the effectiveness of the strategy that they have devised for dealing with intra-team competition

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of their strategy for addressing situations where team members seek sympathy

  • Propose an effective remedy to ‘member withdrawal’

  • Put forward a satisfactory way of addressing ‘special pleading’

  • Demonstrate an effective ‘leader behaviour’ when dealing with dysfunctional behaviours

  • Exhibit tact in discouraging team member distracting behaviours

  • Provide examples of how a leader should encourage desirable behaviours in a team

  • Indicate the range of tangible rewards that might be utilised in a team

  • Propose suitable intangible rewards that might be applied to a team situation

  • Apply appropriate rewards and, or, punishment that are applied to a given team situation – thereby promoting team ‘functionality’

  • Demonstrate an awareness of their ‘Team Building and Maintenance Roles’ that will improve team effectiveness
  • Indicate the steps that they will take to harmonising their teams

  • Establish a basis for standard setting in their teams

  • Demonstrate their understanding of the importance of Gatekeeping in team formal settings

  • Determine the optimum team size for effective functioning

  • Demonstrate their ability to manage conflict effectively, incorporating the occasions when it should be encouraged

  • Outline the steps that they will take to avert groupthink and promote teamthink

  • Demonstrate their understanding of the ‘risky shift syndrome’, outlining the steps that they will take to avert them

  • Demonstrate their ability to employ transactional analysis in a team context

  • Internalise the dysfunctional effect of ‘resonation’ in a team context

  • Suggest how they might employ an effective diversity management that discourages resonation

  • Demonstrate their grasp of the fundamentals of performance management

  • Illustrate how they might resolve interpersonal problems among team members.

  • Indicate how they will help team members to channel their energies into task performance, establishing realistic goals

  • Develop effective communication strategies that might be applied to team settings, minimising technical language

  • Clarify roles in team settings

  • Provide a basis for team standard setting - establishing standards and evaluating progress

  • Illustrate how they will determine the contribution of each team member to team goal accomplishment

  • Recognise and acknowledge performance improvement in teams

  • Indicate how they will reward exceptional performance in their teams

  • Indicate how they will establishing key competencies in teams

  • Suggest how to establish acceptable performance levels in teams, noting performance indicators

  • Propose standards of measuring competence in teams

  • Suggest how to determine which individual members of a team can improve their performance – and subsequently, their contribution to the team as a way of harnessing team synergy

  • Illustrate how they will enhance the issue of ‘gatekeeping’ to ensure that team members, in general, participate in team meetings, extending support to the weak, ensuring that introverted team members are not intimidated or ‘crushed’ by the extroverted

  • Recognise the ineloquent team members

  • Without relevant current

  • Information, who might, nevertheless, be able to perform evaluative role

  • Resonation as an issue in team effectiveness

  • Indicate how they will recognise resonation in their teams, outline the steps that they will take to avert or reduce its occurrence, outlining how they will ‘cautioning’ resonators

  • Suggest ways to counteract the effect of the informal hierarchy - in teams other than command teams

  • Demonstrate their appreciation of the fact that workers belong to different classes, in society

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the notion that societal socio-economic hierarchy might be informally represented in teams

  • Provide an indication of their awareness of the fact that team members’ class consciousness might relate to the positions that they occupy in the organisation or society

  • Exhibit a knowledge of the intimidating effect that class might have on team members, and, hence,

  • The leader’s responsibility to ensure that this informal hierarchy is dispensed with in the promotion of a ‘classless team’

  • Describe the effort that they will make to enhance the ‘critical faculty’ of their team

  • Demonstrate their awareness of the value of team cohesiveness and team solidarity, and the dangers of over-cohesiveness.

Course Contents, Concepts and Issues

  • Groups and Aggregations: Points of Distinction

  • The type and permanence of the leadership of a team

  • When does a situational leader emerge

  • How does the team attempts to replace a situational leader, enhance stability, acceptability or renewed or clarified mission or objectives?

  • Why does a temporary team more problematic to lead than a permanent team?

  • Why does team disbandment have a negative psychological effect on members and leader?

  •  An Aggregation - ‘Togetherness’ or ‘Awareness’?

  • Aggregation and Interaction

  • Team or Group: A Definition and Distinction

  • Team Dynamics

  • Team Typologies

  • Team Typological Bases

  • Command Team

  • Committees

  • Temporary Committees

  • Standing Committees

  • Task Forces;

  • Boards.

A-Single

 

figure2

  • Command Teams and The Organisational Hierarchy

  • Command Teams and The Organisational Functioning

  • Team Formation

  • Team Formation Stage 1: Forming

  • Team Formation Stage 2: Storming

  •      How ‘True-To-Life’ Or Realistic Are The Forming And Norming Stages OF Team Development?

  • Team Formation Stage 3: Norming

  • Team Formation Stage 4: Performing or Total Integration

  • Team Formation Stage 5: Adjourning or Disbanding

  • Deal With The Psychological Effect of Disbandment

  • Dysfunctional Behaviours

  • Addressing Dysfunctional Behaviours

  • Dealing With Aggressiveness

  • Handling Blocking 

  • Dealing With Interfering Behaviour

  • Dealing With Intra-Team Competition

  • Addressing Situations Where Team Members Seek Sympathy

  • Dealing With Member Withdrawal

  • Addressing Special Pleading

  • Leader Behaviour in Dealing with Dysfunctional Behaviours

  • Being Tactful In Discouraging Distracting Behaviours

  • Encouraging Desirable Behaviours

  • Using Tangible Rewards,

  • Using Intangible Rewards

  • Bearing Mindful of Team Situation

  • Applying Appropriate Rewards and, or, Punishment

  • Promoting Team Functionality

  • Team Building and Maintenance Roles: Improving Team Effectiveness
  • Encouraging members

  • Harmonising

  • Standard setting

  • Gatekeeping

  • Determining the optimum team size

  • Providing team incentives

  • Encouraging conflict

  • Averting Groupthink

  • Avoiding the risky shift syndrome

  • Employing transactional analysis

  • Employing effective diversity management and discouraging resonation

  • Encouraging members

  • Harmonising team

  • Performance Management

  • Solving Interpersonal Problems Among Team Members.

  • Helping Team Members To Channel Their Energies Into task performance Establishing Realistic Goals

  • Developing Effective Communication Strategies

  • Minimising Technical Language

  •      Clarifying Roles

  • Standard Setting - Establishing Standards And Evaluating Progress.

  • A Determination Of The Contribution Of Each Team Member To Goal Accomplishment

  • Recognising and Acknowledging Performance Improvement

  • Rewarding Exceptional Performance

  • Establishing Key Competencies

  • Establishing Acceptable Performance Levels

  • Noting Performance Indicators

  • Measuring Competence

  • Which Individual Members Can Improve Their Performance –

  • And Subsequently, Their Contribution To The Team As A Who

  • Harnessing Team Synergy

  • Gatekeeping

  • Making It Possible For Others To Participate,

  • Supporting The Weak

  • Ensuring That Introverted Team Members are not Intimidated Or ‘Crushed’ By The Extroverted

  • Recognising the Ineloquent Team Members

  •        Without Relevant Current

  •       Information to perform evaluative role

  •      Resonation as an issue in team effectiveness

  • Recognising Resonation

  • Taking Steps To Avert or Reduce Resonation

  • ‘Cautioning’ Resonators

  •  Determining The Optimum Team Size.

  • Numbers That Are Best For The Operational Effectiveness Of A Team –

  • Team constitutional contingent factors

  •  TTTeam numbers and member interaction

  • Team Leader’s Direct Communication With Them

  • Members and the intervening factors

  • Team communication as Interaction

  • Necessity of communication reciprocation within teams

  •  Team transaction

  • Team transitional analysis

  • The ‘Child’ in the team

  • The ‘Adult’ in the team

  • The ‘Parent’ in the team

  • The Team leader as a transaction analyst 

 

 

 

Block #6

Block Title

Credit Value

Duration

Course #004

Motivating Workers: Intrinsic and Extrinsic Rewards

1

30 Hours

 Seminar Or Course Objectives:

 By the conclusion of the specific learning & development activities, delegates will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of motives and their value in organisational and subsystem effectiveness

  • Distinguish between the different sets of motivation theories, notably content, process and reinforcement

  • Demonstrate their ability to translate motivation theory into practice

  • Evaluate the appropriateness of the application of particular theoretical aspects of motivation to specific situations

  • Demonstrate their ability to formulate a comprehensive motivation strategy

  • Critically appraise existing motivation strategy within their organisations, identifying and addressing gaps

  • Formulate a workable motivation strategy

  • Follow the common trends in the popular motivation theories.

  • Demonstrate their appreciation of the need for a variance in intrinsic and extrinsic values if motivation.

  • Demonstrate how popular motivation theories have contributed to our understanding of worker behaviour.

  • Locate performance related pay, productivity bonuses and other remuneration inducement within existing motivation theory.

  • Illustrate how the contingency approach to motivation might be applied to different situations.

  • Indicate the part that training and development play in worker motivation.

  • Manage the process of motivation, taking account of socio cultural and economic differences.

  • Manage the motivation process, taking account of the differences in preferences and expectation of workers.

  • Apply the ‘equity’ theory to work situation from a ‘differentiation perspective’, rather than an ‘equality perspective’.

  • Demonstrate the need to balance the ‘individualist’ and ‘collectivist’ perspective to motivation.

 

Motivating Workers: Intrinsic and Extrinsic Rewards

Contents, Concepts and Issues

 

  • Directing Or Leading

  • The Concept of Motivation

  • Theories of Motivation

  • Content Theories & Some of Their Contributors

  • Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

  • Analysis of Maslow’s Claims

  • McClelland's Studies

  • Taylor: Money & Motivation

  • Motivator-Hygiene Factor: Herzberg’s Contribution

  • Process Theories

  • Equity Theory

  • Goal-Setting Theory

  • Expectancy Theory

  • Equitable Reward Systems

  • Reinforcement Theories

  • Reinforcement Theory

  • Motivation & Contingency Theory

  • Designing An Effective Motivation Strategy

  • The collectivist Vs the individualist perspective of motivation

  • Common trends in Motivation theories

  • Intrinsic and extrinsic values of motivation

  • Motivation and worker behaviour

  • The extent to which salary or wages inducement motivate workers

  • Performance Related Pay (PRP)

  • Productivity Bonuses

  • Efficiency Gains

  • Profit Share

  • The contingency approach to motivation

  • Social differentiation in motivation

  • Culture differentiation in motivation

  • Wealth as a factor in motivation

  • Class as an issue in Motivation

  • Individual expectation and motivation

  • Individual preferences as a motivating factor

 

 

 

Block #7

Block Title

Credit Value

Duration

Course #032.B1

Organisation (Organization) and Management: An Introduction

1

30 Hours

 

 

Block Title

Objectives

Contents & Concepts

Fundamentals of Organisational Analysis

By the end of the specified learning and development activities, participants will be able to:

  • Distinguish between formal & social organisations

  • Distinguish between business and non-business organisations

  • List at least three characteristics of a formal organisation

  • List the key features of a collegia

  • Distinguish between power and authority

  • Distinguish

  • Between social & business objectives

  • Distinguish between internal and external accountability

  • State at least three agencies to which an organisation is accountable

  • Introduction to formal organisations:

  • Definition; objectives – social and business;

  • Tasks;

  • Division Of Work/Labour;

  • Delegation;

  • Responsibility;

  • Accountability; Authority;

  • Power;

  • Roles; 

  • Informal organisations; 

  • Case study analysis

The Functions of Management: An Introduction

By the end of the specific learning and development activities, delegates will:

  • Demonstrate an awareness of the difference between managing in stable and turbulent times

  •  

  • Be aware of the different elements, which constitute the role of a manager

  •  

  • Demonstrate a general understanding of how these fundamental elements of management are performed

  •  

  • Demonstrate their ability to establish an effective co-ordinating mechanism

  •  

  • Have designed a ‘leadership strategy’, which has a high probability of greatly enhancing worker motivation and improving their morale - factors crucial to organisational success

  •  

  • Be able to influence their leadership style in such a way that they develop the flexibility to manage their organisations and subsystems effectively, in stable and turbulent times.

  •  

  • Be aware of some key issues in designing effective organisations

  •  

  • Be aware of the importance of organisational design and communication effectiveness.

  •  

  • Be able to establish objectives, designing the mechanism for their accomplishment

  •  

  • Apply effective time management to competitive situations

 

 

 

  • The functions of management

  • The management process: its universality

  • Planning: the basis for the emanation of subsequent functions

  • The different types & levels of planning

  • Planning as objective establishment

  • Planning as a procedural issue

  • Organising process, people & subsystems

  • Fundamental issues in designing organisations

  • Management implications for tall & flat structures

  • An introduction to basic organisational forms:

  • Simple structure

  • Functional structure

  • Divisional structure

  • Matrix structure

  • Organisational design as a function of organisational dynamics

  • Important considerations in organisational design

  • Designing for effective product/service management

  • Designing for communication effectiveness

  • Designing for effective client/customer focus

  • Importance of vertical & horizontal relationships

  • Directing or leading

  • Directing or leading? : a question of leadership styles & administrative strategies

  • Directing or leading? : managerial control vs worker autonomy

  • The relationship between leadership & worker motivation

  • Co-ordinating - mintzberg’s bases of co-ordination

  • Mutual adjustment

  • Direct supervision

  • Output

  • Standardisation of input

  • Standardisation of work process

  • Managing organisations in a stable environment

  • Managing organisations in an unstable environment

  • Increased leisure time

  • Enhanced job satisfaction

  • Reduced stress

  • More opportunity to switch off after hours

  • More room for forward planning & long-term solutions

  • Higher creativity

  • Time management tips for managers

  • Reducing time spent on meetings

  • Meeting management

  • The trading game scenario

 

 

Delegating For Organisational Effectiveness

By the conclusion of the specified learning activities, participants will:

  • Be aware of the importance of delegation in human resource & organisational development

  • Be aware of the benefits of delegation to delegates

  • Be aware of the benefits of delegation to delegates

  • Have exhibited confidence in delegating

  • Be aware of the importance of communication in the process of delegation

  • Be able to determine the factors that delegates should ascertain before delegating tasks

  • Be better able to determine the support that delegates should give to their delegates during their performance of the specified tasks

 

  • What is delegation?

  • Advantages of delegation to delegates

  • What might be delegated?

  • Benefits of delegation to delegates

  • Prerequisites for effective delegation

  • Support necessary during task performance

  • Importance of communication in delegation

  • Importance of power & authority in delegation

  • Problems of ineffective delegation

 

 

 

Block #7

Block Title

Credit Value

Duration

Course # 148

Organisational Culture and Cross-Cultural Communication

1

30 Hours

 

Course Programme for Organisational Culture and Cross-Cultural Communication

Leading to Diploma-Postgraduate in Organisational Culture and Cross-Cultural Communication

  

Organisational Culture

  •   Understanding Organisational Culture

  • Concept of Organisational Culture

  • Layers of Organisational Culture

  • Framework for Organisational Culture

  • Elements of Organisational Culture

  • Culture Classification

  • Role Culture

  • Task Culture

  • Power Culture

  • Types of Organisational Culture

  • Constructive

  • Passive-Defensive

  • Aggressive-Defensive

  • Factors Influencing Organisational Culture

  • The Relationship between Power Culture and Organisational Structure

  • Sources of Culture

  • Culture As a Liability

  • Culture and Managerial Action

  • Organisational Culture Improvement

  •  

  • Influencing and Managing Organisational Culture

  •  

  • How Organisation Culture is Formed

  • Embedding Organisation Culture

  • Building Organisation Culture

  • Strong Culture vs. Weak Culture

  • How Employees Learn Culture

  • How Culture Affects Managers

  • Implication or Process/Maintaining Culture

  • Keeping a Culture Alive

  • Measuring Organisational Culture

  • Quantitative

  • Qualitative

  • Managing Organisational Culture

  • Functions of Culture

 

The Symbiotic Relationship Between Organisational Culture and Organisational Structure

  • Structural Variations

  • Simple Structure and Cultural Practices

  • Functional Structure, Norms, Values, Ritualistic Cultural Practices

  • Divisional Structure and cultural Inclinations

  • The Role Culture and its Structural Manifestation

  • The Task Culture and its Structural Symbiosis

  • The Concept of ‘Flexion’ in Culture-Structure Symbiosis

 

Culture and the Management of Change

  •  How to Change Culture

  • The Need for Culture Change

  • Elements Affecting Culture Change

  • Why Culture Doesn’t Change?

  • When Culture Can Change

  • The Effect of Culture on Organisational Change

  • Organisational Change and Cultural Resistance

  • Cultural Cementation

  • Flexibility VS ‘Flexion’ in organisational Change

Conducting a Cultural Analysis
  • Diagnosing the current organizational culture

  • Defining the desired organizational culture

  • Performing a gap analysis

 

Cross-Cultural Communication

  •  Defining Communication

  • Communication: The Flow

  • What is Effective Communication?

  • Barriers to Cultural Communication

  • Ethnocentrism

  • Stereotyping

  • Cultural Blindness

  • Cultural Imposition

  • Tone Differences

  • Discrimination

  • General Guidelines for Managers to Overcome Conflicts in Workplace Due to Discriminatory Attitude of Employees

  • The Communication Process

  • Problems of Language

  • Effects of Culture on Cross-Cultural Communication

  • Methods of Communication

  • Oral

  • Written

  • Nonverbal

  • Electronic (Computer-Aided Communication)

  • Codes Use in Communication

  • Cross Culture Communication

  • Importance of Cross Culture Communication

  • Different Attitudes Towards Various factors of Human Relationship

  • Time

  • Space

  • Frankness

  • Values

  • Expression of Emotions

  • Verbal Communication Differences

  • High Context and Low Context Cultures

  • Uncertainty and Anxiety

  • Strategies to Reduce Anxiety

  • How to Resolve Conflict

  • Learning About Other Cultures

  • Eye Contact

  • Gesture

  • Developing Cross Cultural Communication Skills

  • Reminders while Interacting and Connecting with People

  • Handshake

  • Improving Cross Cultural Communication

  • Welcome Topics

  • Topics to Avoid During Conversation

  • Precautions in Cross-Cultural Communication

 

 

 

 

Block #8

Block Title

Credit Value

Duration

Course # 140

Advanced Business Communication

2

60 Hours

 

Course Programme for Advanced Business Communication

Written Communication: An Overview

Introduction

  • Principles of Business Writing

  • 4 Stages of Writing

  • Using Mind Maps and Writing Plan

  • Business Correspondence

  • Common Mistakes in Business Letter Writing

Presentation of Business Documents

  • Parts of a Business Letter

  • Business Letter Formats

  • Styles in Business Correspondence

  • Open Punctuation

  • Memos

  • Fax Messages

Structuring Your Communications - 4-Point Plan

  • Introduction

  • Details

  • Response or Action

  • Closure

Language and Tone

  • The Weakest Link in Your Business Writing

  • Ten Steps to Good Business Writing

E-mail

  • The Explosive Growth of E-Mail

  • Seven Deadly Sins of Working with E-Mail

  • The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of E-Mail

  • The Weakest Link in Your E-Mails

  • How Can You Make E-Mail Work For You?

  • Customer Care and E-Mail

  • Creating Electronic Rapport

  • E-Mail @ Work

  • Netiquette

Drafting Common Business Documents

 

Inquiries and Replies

  • Requests for Catalogues and Price Lists

  • General Enquiries and Replies

  • Requests for Goods on Approval

  • Visits by Travelers

  • Requests for Concessions

Quotations, Estimates and Tenders

  • Terminology

  • Routine Quotations

  • Quotations Subject To Conditions of Acceptance

  • Tabulated Quotations

  • Estimates and Specifications

  • Tenders

  • Quotations Not Accepted or Amended

  • Follow-Up Letters

Orders and Their Fulfilment

  • Placing Orders

  • Routine Orders

  • Acknowledging Orders

  • Declining Orders

  • Counter-Offers from Suppliers

  • Packing and Dispatch

Invoicing and Settlement of Account

  • Invoices and Adjustments

  • Pro Forma Invoices

  • Debit and Credit Notes

  • Statements of Account

  • Varying the Terms of Payment

  • Methods of Payment

Letters Requesting Payment

  • Tone

  • Late Payments

  • Collection Letters:

Credit and Status Inquiries

  • Reasons for Credit

  • Disadvantages of Credit

  • Requests for Credit

  • Business References

  • Status Enquiries

  • Replies to Status Enquiries

A Typical Business Transaction

  • Request for Quotation

  • Supplier's Quotation

  • Request for Permission to Quote Company As A Reference

  • Permission Granted

  • Order

  • Supplier's Acknowledgement

  • Advice Note

  • Consignment Note

  • Delivery Note Invoice Debit and Credit Notes

  • Statement of Account

  • Payment

  • Receipt 

Dealing with Other Important Business Documents

Complaints and Adjustments

  • Handling Complaints

  • Complaints Concerning Goods

  • Complaints Concerning Delivery

  • Cancelling Orders

  • Personal Complaints

Goodwill Messages

  • General Goodwill Letters

  • Letters of Apology

  • Letters in Which Tone Is Particularly Important

  • Letters of Thanks

  • Letters of Congratulation

  • Letters of Condolence and Sympathy

Reports and Proposals

  •  Introduction to Reports and Proposals

  • The Plain English Guide to Writing Reports

  • Defining the Purpose

  • Investigating the Topic

  • Organising the Report into Sections

  • Order of Presentation

  • Order of Writing

  • Numbering Sections and Paragraphs

  • Planning the Writing- Revision

Notices, Advertisements and Information Sheets

  • Notices

  • Advertisements

  • Leaflets and Information Sheets

  • Design Skills

Circulars

  • Circulars Announcing Changes in Business Organization

  • Circulars Announcing Changes in Business Partnerships

  • Letters Announcing Change of Representatives

  • Internal Circulars to Staff

  • Circulars with Reply Forms

Sales Letters and Voluntary Offers

  • The Weakest Link in Your Sales Letters

  • Successful Sales Letters

  • Specimen Sales Letters

  • Voluntary Offers

Publicly Materials

  • Press Releases

  • Newsletters

  • Writing Skills

Marketing Matters

  • Identifying Your Audiences

  • Why Is Customer Care So Important?

  • Customer Care through Internet and E-Mail

  • Marketing through the Web 

Business Plan

  • Components of a Business Plan

Meetings Documentation

  • Notice and Agenda

  • Minutes of Meetings

  • Types of Minutes

 

Personnel

  • Letters of Application

  • Testimonials

  • Favourable References

  • Unfavourable References

  • Interview Letters

  • Offers of Appointment

  • Termination of Employment

  • Sundry Personnel Matters

Presenting Data and Statistics through Graph, Table, Chart and Diagram