Decision-Making in Organisations: Structural Design Myths and Realities, PG Course, in Dubai KL London Abuja Accra Colombo, Online

HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute, Providing Postgraduate Diploma; PG Certificate; & PG Short Courses, in Dubai, London, Kuala Lumpur, Colombo, New Delhi, Islamabad, Abuja, Accra, Lagos, Lusaka, Paris, Wolverhampton, Birmingham, Banjul, Amman, Doha, Kuwait, Cairo, Manama, Nairobi, Jeddah, etc. & Online.

Course Number 069 - Decision-making in Organisations (Organizations): Structural Design Myths and Realities Course, Leading to Diploma - Postgraduate - in Organisational Decision-making, 30 Credit-Hours, accumulating,  to a Postgraduate Certificate, with 150 additional Credit-Hours, and a Postgraduate Diploma, with 330 additional Credit-Hours. Contents include Models of Decision-Making, Characteristics of Decision Process, Decision making Reality, Decision-Making Effectiveness, Normative Decision Models, Bounded Rationality, Communication and Decision-Making Effectiveness,

 

Barriers of Communication, Groupthink and Teamthink, Organisational Effectiveness, Conceptual Exploration, Information Availability, Information Accuracy, Degrees of Centralisation and Decentralisation, Benefits of Decentralization, Costs of Decentralization, Decentralization and Multinational Operations, ‘Playing It Safe, Mechanistic and Organismic Structures, Environmental Scanning, Competitive and PESTEL Forces, Structural Facilitation, ‘Layering’ in Decision-making, Decision Formulation, Dissemination and Emergence, Resolution as Decision-making, Industrial Democracy, Decision-making Process and ‘Organisational Health’.

 

Decision-Making in Organisations (Organizations): Structural Design Myths and Realities Seminar or Course, leading to Diploma – Postgraduate in Organisational Decision-Making, Accumulating to a Postgraduate Diploma. Click to View and, or, Download the PDF Brochure for this Course.

 

For Whom This Course is Designed

This Course is Designed for:

  • Chief Executives;

  • Chief Executive Officers;

  • Company Secretaries;

  • Chief Operating Officers;

  • Chief Financial Officers;

  • Management Accountants;

  • Executive Directors;

  • Divisional Directors;

  • Human Resource Directors;

  • Corporate Managers;

  • Corporate Strategists;

  • Divisional Managers;

  • Functional Managers;

  • Human Resource Specialists;

  • Organisational Design Specialists;

  • Organisational Development Specialists;

  • Line Managers;

  • Internal Consultants;

  • Independent Consultants;

  • Lecturers;

  • All Others who are desirous in obtaining cutting-edge for improving the effectiveness of their decision-making, within the context of simple, functional, divisional and matrix structures, and their hybrids.

 

Course Co-ordinator:        

Prof. Dr. R. B. Crawford is Course Coordinator. He is the Director of HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute, A Postgraduate-Only Institution. He has the following Qualifications and Affiliations:

Doctor of Philosophy {(PhD) {University College London (UCL) - University of London)};

MEd Management (University of Bath);

Postgraduate (Advanced) Diploma Science Teacher Ed. (University of Bristol);

Postgraduate Certificate in Information Systems (University of West London, formerly Thames Valley University);

Diploma in Doctoral Research Supervision, (University of Wolverhampton);

Teaching Certificate;

Fellow of the Institute of Management Specialists;

Human Resources Specialist, of the Institute of Management Specialists;

Member of the Asian Academy of Management (MAAM);

Member of the International Society of Gesture Studies (MISGS);

Member of the Standing Council for Organisational Symbolism (MSCOS);

Member of ResearchGate;

Executive Member of Academy of Management (AOM). There, his contribution incorporates the judging of competitions, review of journal articles, and guiding the development of conference papers. He also contributes to the Disciplines of:

Human Resources;

Organization and Management Theory;

Organization Development and Change;

Research Methods;

Conflict Management;

Organizational Behavior;

Management Consulting;

Gender & Diversity in Organizations; and

Critical Management Studies.

Professor Dr. Crawford has been an Academic in the following UK Universities:

University of London (Royal Holloway), as Research Tutor;

University of Greenwich (Business School), as Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor), in Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management;

University of Wolverhampton, (Wolverhampton Business School), as Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor), in Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management;

London Southbank University (Business School), as Lecturer and Unit Leader.

His responsibilities in these roles included:

Doctoral Research Supervisor;

Admissions Tutor;

Postgraduate and Undergraduate Dissertation Supervisor;

Programme Leader;

Personal Tutor.

 

Duration: 5 Days

 Cost:   £5,000.00 Per Delegate.

 

The course cost does not include living accommodation. However, delegates are treated with the following:

  •  Free Continuous snacks throughout the Event Days;  

  •  Free Hot Lunch on Event Days;                           

  •  Free City Tour;             

  •  Free Stationery;                               

  •  Free On-site Internet Access;

  • HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s   Diploma – Postgraduate; or

  • Certificate of Attendance and Participation – if unsuccessful on resit.

 

HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Complimentary Products include:

  • HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Leather Conference Folder;

  • HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Leather Conference Ring Binder/ Writing Pad;

  • HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Key Ring/ Chain;

  • HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Leather Conference (Computer – Phone) Bag – Black or Brown;

  • HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s 8GB USB Flash Memory Drive, with Course/ Programme Material;

  • HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Metal Pen;

  • HRODC Postgraduate Training Institute’s Polo Shirt.

 

 

Location:  Central London and International Locations

Daily Schedule: 9:30 to 4:30 pm.

 

 

Decision-Making in Organisations (Organizations): Structural Design Myths and Realities Seminar or Course, leading to Diploma – Postgraduate in Organisational Decision-Making, Accumulating to a Postgraduate Diploma. Click to View and, or, Download the PDF Brochure for this Course.

 

Course Objectives

By the conclusion of the specified learning and development activities, delegates will be able to:

  • Distinguish between decision centralisation and decentralisation;

  • Provide at least two examples of organisations which facilitate decision-making centralisation and decentralisation, respectively;

  • Suggest at least two benefits of decision-making decentralization;

  • Indicate at least two problems of decision-making decentralization;

  • Determine the degree to which decentralization of decision-making in multinational operations are, on balance, beneficial or problematic;

  • Suggest whether corporate decisions to centralise decision-making might be simply ‘playing it safe’;

  • Indicate the degree to which decision-making centralisation and decentralisation are facilitated by mechanistic and organismic structures;

  • Vividly illustrate how environmental scanning of competitive and PESTEL forces and are structurally facilitated;

  • Demonstrate their understanding of the concept of ‘layering’ in decision-making;

  • Explain why Problem Resolution should be categorized as decision-making;

  • Provide an acceptable explanation to the concept of industrial democracy, as a factor in decision-making;

  • Indicate the relationship between decision-making process and ‘organisational health’;

  • Explain the suggestion that decision-making is represent strategic and operational choices;

  • Link each of the following Decision-making Patterns with Functional, Divisional and Matrix Structures, respectively;

  • Pattern ‘A’ Decision-making;

  • Pattern ‘B’ Decision-making;

  • Pattern ‘C’ Decision-making;

  • Pattern ‘D’ Decision-making;

  • Pattern ‘E’ Decision-making

  • Provide accurate guidance on the effectiveness of individual vs team-participative decision-making in organisations

  • Establish the value of and problems with individual participation in decision-making;

  • Indicate the benefits and drawbacks of team participation in decision-making;

  • Explain the prevailing theory surrounding team decision-making and risky-shift syndrome;

  • Provide discussion lead on “real participation vs pseudo participation in decision-making process: commitment or frustration”;

  • Support the notion that meetings are a forum for decision-making;

  • Provide theoretical evidence that meeting effectiveness is vital for sound decision-making;

  • Discuss the extent to which effective convening of meetings supports decision-making;

  • Define the concept resonation, providing at least one example;

  • Explain the degree to which ‘resonation’ impairs the decision-making process;

  • Expound the role of the board as supreme decision-making entity;

  • Illustrate the management of hedging decisions, factoring PESTEL elements;

  • Discuss, with certainty, the value of ‘options’ in decision-making;

  • Illustrate the use of ‘options’ to manage risky decisions;

  • Provide practicable advice on decision-making, in relation to risk and business continuity.

Course Contents, Concepts and Issues

 

Part 1: Conceptualising and Contextualising Decision-Making: An Analysis of the Decision-Making Process in Organisations (1)

  • Decision-Making: A Conceptual Exploration;

  • A Generalised Model of Decision Making;

  • Generalised Characteristics of the Decision Process;

  • The Idealised Decision-making Process: Exploring Decision-making Reality;

  • Decision-making Effectiveness: Applying The ‘Stress Test’;

  • Normative Decision Models and the Concept of ‘Bounded Rationality’:

  • The Concept of Rationality;

  • Information Availability;

  • Information Accuracy.

  • Communication and Decision-making Effectiveness:

  • Communication and Its Value in Effective Decision Making;

  • Internal and External Communication;

  • Barriers of Communication and their Negative Effect on Decision-making.

  • ‘Groupthink’ vs ‘Teamthink’ in Decision-making: Their Conceptualisation, and Implications;

  • Centralisation VS Decentralisation of Decision-making and Their Implication for Organisational Effectiveness

  • Part 2: Conceptualising and Contextualising Decision-Making: An Analysis of the Decision-Making Process in Organisations (2)

  • Decision Centralisation and Decentralisation: A Distinction;

  • Degrees of Centralisation and Decentralisation of Deciision-making;

  • Benefits of Decentralization;

  • Costs of Decentralization;

  • Decentralization and Multinational Operations;

  • Centralisation: ‘Playing It Safe’;

  • Decision-making Centralisation and Decentralisation and their Facilitation by Mechanistic and Organismic Structures;

  • Environmental Scanning of Competitive and PESTEL Forces and their Structural Facilitation;

  • The Concept of ‘Layering’ in Decision-making: Decision Formulation, Dissemination and Emergence;

  • Problem Resolution as Decision-making;

  • The Concept of Industrial Democracy as a Factor in Decision-making;

  • The Decision-making Process and ‘Organisational Health’;

  • Decision-making as Strategic and Operational Choices;

  • Decision-making Patterns in Functional, Divisional and Matrix Structures;

  • Pattern ‘A’ Decision-making;

  • Pattern ‘B’ Decision-making;

  • Pattern ‘C’ Decision-making;

  • Pattern ‘D’ Decision-making;

  • Pattern ‘E’ Decision-making.

  • Management Information System as a Structural Derivative:

  • Deconstructing Management Information System;

  • Computerised Information Systems and Strategic and Operational Decision-making Speed and Accuracy;

  • Management Accounting System and its Contribution to an Effective Management Information System.

Part 3: Individual and Team Participation in Decision-Making: Implications for Its Implementation and Effectiveness

  • Individual VS Team-participative Decision-making;

  • Value of and Problems with Individual Participation in Decision-making;

  • Benefits and Drawbacks of Team Participation in Decision-making;

  • Team Decision-making and Risky-Shift Syndrome: Their Effect on Corporate and Operational Decision-making;

  • Real Participation Vs Pseudo Participation in Decision-making Process: Commitment or Frustration;

  • Meetings as a Forum for Decision-making:

  • Meeting Effectiveness;

  • Convening for Decision Effectiveness;

  • Meeting to facilitate Individual Participation in Decision-making.

  •  ‘Resonation’ As an Impairment of the Decision-making Process:

  • Contextualising Resonation;

  • Defining Resonation;

  • The Effect of Resonation on ‘Hijacker’s’ Vocalisation;

  • The Negative Effect of Resonation on Genuine Informant;

  • The Overall Negative Impact of Resonation on Strategic and Operational Decision-making;

  • The Role of Gatekeeping in Averting or Eliminating Resonation.

 

Part 4: Decision-Making and Risk Management: An Introduction

  • Defining Risk;
  • Contextualising Risk;

  • Risk Probability and Improbability

  • The Traditional ‘Number Line’ and Traditional Risk Management Calculation

  • ‘Risk-Improbability Scale or Continuum’;

  • Understanding Risk in Organisations;

  • Examples of Financial Risks in Decisions:

  • Liquidity Risk;

  • Operating Risk;

  • Performance Risk;

  • Fraud Risk;

  • Settlement Risk;

  • Counterparty Risks.

  • The Currency Derivatives Market;

  • Financial Exposure as Risk:

  • Economic Exposure;

  • Transaction Exposure;

  • Translation Exposure.

  • Risk Exposure and Yield Expectations;

  • What Is Risk Management?

  • Developing Strategies and Approaches to Treat and Manage Risk;

  • Risk-related Decisions: When to Mitigate or Not to Mitigate;

  • Decisions Involving Financial Derivatives;

  • Financial Leverage Decisions;

  • Hedging Decisions and PESTEL Changes: Striking a Balance;

  • The Value of ‘Options’ in Decision-making;

  • Using ‘Options’ to Manage Risky Decisions;

  • Decision-making, Risk and Business Continuity;

  • Developing Criteria for Determining Acceptable Levels or Residual Risk;

  • Financial Risk and ‘Market Dynamics’;

  • Individual vs Team Financial Decision-making and Risky Shift: Empirical Refutation of Prevailing Theory or Anecdotal Evidence?

 

Part 5: Decision Making as an Important Function of Organisations: An Empirical Analysis of Decision-Making in Divisional and Matrix Structures

  •  The Role of the Board as Supreme Decision-making Entity;

  • Board Structure and Membership;

  • Committees and Subcommittees;

  • Individual Participation in Decision-making in Divisional and Matrix Structures;

  • Meeting Attendance in Specialist Groupings in Divisional and Matrix Organisations Compared;

  • Meeting Attendance in ‘Project’/ Operational Groupings in Divisional and Matrix Organisations Compared;

  • Contribution to Meeting Agenda in Divisional and Matrix Organisations;

  • Knowledge of Agenda Establishment Process;

  • Knowledge of Contributors to Agenda;

  • Opportunity to Contribute to Agenda;

  • Meetings and Their Contribution to the Decision-making Process

  • Frequency with Which Members’ Views Were Accepted at Specialist Meetings;

  • Frequency with Which Members’ Views Were Accepted at Project/ Operational Meetings;

  • Frequency with Which Members’ Views Were Accepted at Specialist Meetings;

  • Representation of Operators’ Views at Board Level;

  • Higher Level Participation in Decision-making: A Summative and Conclusive Empirical Exploration.

Decision-Making in Organisations (Organizations): Structural Design Myths and Realities Seminar or Course, leading to Diploma – Postgraduate in Organisational Decision-Making, Accumulating to a Postgraduate Diploma. Click to View and, or, Download the PDF Brochure for this Course.