PG Dip in Business Management, inc. Accounting, Budgeting, Business Analysis, Change Management, Client Care, Corporate Managers, Costing, Executive Managers, Finance, HRD, HRM, Internal Change, Leadership Skills, Management Skills, Organisational Climate, Organisational Culture, Organisational Values, Organizational Analysis, Organizational Design, Project Management, Sales and Marketing, Trainer Training, Training for Trainers, Training Needs Analysis, in Abuja, Accra, Amman, Bangkok, Banjul, Beirut, Birmingham, Bogotá, Brasilia, Brunei, Brussels, Bucharest, Cairo, Colombo, Conakry, Dodoma, Doha, Dubai, Durban, Gaborone, Georgetown, Hanoi, Islamabad, Jakarta, Jeddah, Kathmandu, Kinshasa, Kuala Lumpur, Kuwait, Lagos, Lima, London, Luanda, Lusaka, Manama, Manila, Maputo, Muscat, Nairobi, New Delhi, New York, Niamey, Paramaribo, Paris, Quito, Rabat, Seoul, Singapore, Tokyo, Toronto, Tripoli, Windhoek, Wolverhampton, etc. and Online.

#020 Business Management Programme, Leading to Postgraduate Diploma in Business Management. Click to Download Brochure.

Despite the absence of universality regarding the constituents of Business Management, I suggest six broad categories of Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Short Training Courses: Accounting and Finance; Costing and Budgeting; Human Resource Development; Human Resource Management; Leadership Skills; Management Skills; Project Management; and Sales and Marketing. Within these categories   are several Postgraduate Diploma Programmes, Postgraduate Certificate, and, or, Postgraduate Short Courses. All three qualifications might be studied through ‘In-Classroom’ or ‘Video-Enhanced Online’ Mode.

Doctor of Philosophy {(PhD) {University College London (UCL) - University of London)};

MEd Management (University of Bath);

Postgraduate (Advanced) Diploma Science Teacher Ed. (University of Bristol);

Postgraduate Certificate in Information Systems (University of West London, formerly Thames Valley University);

Diploma in Doctoral Research Supervision, (University of Wolverhampton);

Teaching Certificate;

Fellow of the Institute of Management Specialists;

Human Resources Specialist, of the Institute of Management Specialists;

Member of the Asian Academy of Management (MAAM);

Member of the International Society of Gesture Studies (MISGS);

Member of the Standing Council for Organisational Symbolism (MSCOS);

Member of ResearchGate;

Executive Member of Academy of Management (AOM). There, his contribution incorporates the judging of competitions, review of journal articles, and guiding the development of conference papers. He also contributes to the Disciplines of:

Human Resources;

Organization and Management Theory;

Organization Development and Change;

Research Methods;

Conflict Management;

Organizational Behavior;

Management Consulting;

Gender & Diversity in Organizations; and

Critical Management Studies.

Professor Dr. Crawford has been an Academic in the following UK Universities:

University of London (Royal Holloway), as Research Tutor;

University of Greenwich (Business School), as Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor), in Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management;

University of Wolverhampton, (Wolverhampton Business School), as Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor), in Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management;

London Southbank University (Business School), as Lecturer and Unit Leader.

His responsibilities in these roles included:

Doctoral Research Supervisor;

Admissions Tutor;

Postgraduate and Undergraduate Dissertation Supervisor;

Programme Leader;

Personal Tutor.

 

Classroom-Based Duration and Cost:

Classroom-Based Duration:

12 Weeks

Classroom-Based Cost:

Ł45,000.00 Per Student

Group Discount:

Varies With Group Size

Synchronous Online (Video-Enhanced) Duration and Cost

Online Duration:

20 Weeks @ 3 Hours Per Day, 6 Days Per Week

Normal Online Cost:

Ł30,150.00 Per Student

 

Business Management Programme, Leading to Postgraduate Diploma in Business Management

Module 1:

 Leading To Postgraduate Certificate in Business Management

For Whom This Module or Programme is Designed

This Module or programme is Designed For:

 Any Non-Financial Managers who are required to read, interpret, and contribute to business financial reports;

Assets Accountants;

Attorneys;

Board of Directors;

Business Analysts;

CEOs who are involved with development of long-term customers, suppliers, outsourcing Partners, and other Global Strategic Alliances;

Chief Executive Officers;

Chief Executives;

Chief Secretaries;

Civil Engineers;

Consultants;

Corporate Managers;

Cost Accountant;

Cost and Management Accountant;

Directors;

Entrepreneurs;

Executive Directors;

Executive Managers;

Financial and budget controllers who are moving to wider responsibilities ;

Financial planners and cost analysts;

First appointment managers on fast-track development Programmes;

Functional Managers;

Fund Holders;

General Investors;

Human Resource Managers;

Human Resource Practitioners;

Individuals with a genuine interest in Issues associated with Organisational Management.

Individuals with a genuine interest in Issues associated with Project Management;

Internal Auditors;

It May Also Be Beneficial To Consultants and External Accountants who work with managers and executives, in the support of improvements to operational and financial processes.

Junior Managers;

Lecturers;

Line Managers;

Management Graduates;

Management Lecturers;

Managers and Supervisors from every business discipline and department who have to run departments and plan, cost and budget during their business lives;

Managers who have to plan, cost and budget new business ventures;

Managers who need to know more about business planning, budgeting, costing terms and techniques;

Managers who require a refresher programme on the topic or who would benefit from having an opportunity to consider new ideas and methods;

Managers with direct financial responsibilities;

Marketing, Engineering and Human Resources Managers;

Middle Managers;

Non-Executive Directors;

Organisational Development Practitioners;

Performance Measurement Specialists;

Productivity Specialists;

Programme Managers;

Project Commissioners;

Project Evaluators;

Project Managers;

Project Monitoring Personnel;

Project Team Leaders;

Public Accountants;

Sales and Marketing Executives;

Senior Financial Advisors;

Senior Financial Officers;

Senior managers who supervise people with financial responsibilities;

Senior Managers;

Senior Managers;

Supervisors;

Supply-Stream Professionals;

Team Members;

Value Analysts;

Value Engineers;

Venture Capitalists;

Vice Presidents of Manufacturing and Commercial Businesses;

Vice Presidents;

Individuals with a genuine interest in Issues associated with Organisational Management.

 

 

Module 1 or Programme Objectives

By the conclusion of the specified learning and development activities, delegates will be able to:

Analyse how delegation contributes towards effective time management;

Analyse the concept of leasing in relation to delegating;

Analyse the perception in each role;

Ascertain how activity-based management improves processes and profitability;

Ascertain the concept of delegation;

Ascertain the impact of cost structure changes;

Ascertain the importance of competitor information and strategic positioning towards the success of an organisation;

Ascertain the importance of delegating tasks;

Ascertain the importance of equity capital;

Ascertain the information contained in profit and loss account pertaining to the company;

Ascertain the relationship between an incumbent’s experience and role enactment;

Ascertain the relationship between an incumbent’s role perception and his or her role performance;

Ascertain the strategy on how to create a cost-aware organisation;

Demonstrate familiarity with the different components of the profit and loss account;

Demonstrate familiarity with the outline of strategic management accounting;

Demonstrate familiarity with the structure of the cash flow statement;

Be knowledgeable of some key cost concepts;

Calculate the Return on Investment (ROI) in Education, Training and Development;

Calculate Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) using the correct formula;

Cite the link between culture and managerial action;

Conceptualise classical organisational theory and design, neo-classical, humanistic and contingency organisational design approaches;

Contrast job-costing systems and process costing and explain how they are used to accumulate, track and assign product costs;

Address the external organisational accountability;

Define free cash flows and identify the inclusions thereof;

Define gearing;

Define important cost terms and give their corresponding purpose;

Define investment;

Define objectives, generally;

Define profit;

Define role set;

Define role;

Define variance analysis and give its function;

Define, describe and analyse the nature of an organisation;

Demonstrate a heightened knowledge of how training needs might be devised from Strategic Plans;

Demonstrate a heightened understanding of role relationships;

Demonstrate an appreciation of important of welfare in the development of personal management and human resource management;

Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of power and how it might be applied for the benefit of the organisation;

Demonstrate an understanding of the issue of ‘responsibility’ and how it translates in superior-subordinate relationships in organizations

Demonstrate awareness of the importance of communication in the process of Human Resource Management;

Demonstrate their ability to conduct a Human Resource Audit;

Demonstrate their ability to determine the type of commitment that motivate particular individuals to join an organisation;

Demonstrate their ability to lead a recruitment and Selection Team;

Demonstrate their ability to manage recruitment and selection within a ‘resourcing context’.

Demonstrate their understanding of distinction between Personnel Management and Human Resource Management;

Describe and enumerate some single and dual status organisations;

Describe role as the behavioural expectations of a role set;

Describe self-ideal as a behavioural construct;

Describe the bureaucratic organisations, adhocratic organisations, mechanistic organisations, organismic organisations;

Describe the democratic incumbent, autocratic incumbent, the generous incumbent, the dedicated incumbent, the social self and the role of each;

Design a Job Description;

Design a Personnel Specification;

Design and Weight a Candidate Assessment Form (CAF);

Determine how cost of debt is measured;

Determine how rolling budget makes a manager’s budget realistic and attainable;

Determine how the budget of a business is plan and control through cost-management;

Determine some exemplifying roles;

Determine the benefits of the organisation out of the flexed budgets;

Determine the boundary relationship of a role set;

Determine the different parts of the balance sheet;

Determine the factors influencing Human Resource Planning;

Determine the factors that Delegatees should ascertain before delegating tasks;

Determine the importance of is cash flow;

Determine the limitations of CVP analysis;

Determine the links between corporate planning and human resource planning;

Determine the organisation’s opportunity costs in providing Education, Training and Development for its Employees;

Determine the place of an incumbent’s perceived role expectations on his or her role enactment;

Determine the resources necessary to enhance individual and team performance;

Determine the support that Delegators should give to their Delegatees, during their performance of the specified tasks.

Determine the use of cost management information and its benefits;

Determine the use of non-financial information together with financial information;

Determine the uses and purpose of accounting;

Determine when there is a need to review an organization’s Human Resource Plans;

Differentiate between investment appraisal criteria and investment decisions;

Differentiate cash from profit as a measure of performance, EBITDA;

Differentiate direct cost from indirect costs;

Differentiate fixed and flexed budget and determine under the situation under which they are used;

Differentiate managerial control and worker autonomy and professionalism in mechanistic organisations;

Differentiate operational centralisation and decentralisation;

Differentiate product cost from period costs;

Differentiate social objectives from business objectives;

Discover how cost drivers generate cost and give examples of cost drivers;

Discover how under-costing and over-costing influence profitability;

Discover how variance analysis helps management understand the present costs and control future costs;

Discuss, with confidence, the factors that are associated with poor performance;

Distinguish absorption costing and variable costing;

Distinguish among internal, upward and downward organisational accountability;

Distinguish between Education, Training and Development;

Distinguish between formal and informal organisations;

Distinguish between informal management and formal management succession charts;

Distinguish cash and profit;

Distinguish fixed cost and variable costs and give examples for each;

Draft accounting reports and statements;

Elucidate the concerns of managers in delegating;

Enumerate examples of business and non-business organisations;

Enumerate the components of a master budget;

Enumerate the factors influencing effective delegation;

Enumerate the purposes of budgeting;

Enumerate the sources of finance;

Enumerate the types of variances and give the reasons for their occurrence;

Establish the cost/volume/profit (CVP) relationships;

Establish the link between role and the external environment;

Establish the link between role and the internal environment;

Establish the link of process development to costing;

Establish the links between the profit and loss account and balance sheet;

Establish the links between three accounting statements: the cash flow statement, profit and loss account and balance sheet;

Establish the relationship between delegation and external candidature;

Establish the relationship between power, culture and organisational structure;

Establish the relationship between self-ideal and a performance enhancer;

Establish the relationship between strategic accounting systems, and the balanced scorecard;

Exhibit their ability to take appropriate measures to improve Individual and Team Performance;

Explain cost allocation in joint-cost situation;

Explain facets #1 and 2 of authority;

Explain how managers and subordinates benefit from delegating;

Explain how production-related activities are classified under cost hierarchy;

Explain how social objectives lead to profitability gain;

Explain how target costing and target pricing help determine and achieve a target cost for a product and specify their implications;

Explain some accounting language and terminology;

Explain the accountant’s role in the organisation;

Explain the concept of accruals and monetary concepts;

Explain the concept of capital rationing and control of capital investment projects;

Explain the concept of delegation as internal promotion;

Explain the concept of organisational culture;

Explain the concept of segmental expectations;

Explain the different classification of culture;

Explain the motivation and the behavioural aspects of budgeting;

Explain the process and value of Human Resource Audit;

Explain the underlying concept of Investors in People (IIP);

Explore the bases for ‘division of labour/work’ in organisations and their relation to organisational effectiveness;

Expound the facet of authority, providing practical examples

Find out how life cycle product budgeting and costing assist in pricing decision;

Find out how zero-based budgeting fixed poorly figured, previously budgeted amount;

Give the bases of divisional organisational structure;

Identify role segments;

Identify some organisational tasks and determine how tasks are grouped;

Identify the components of cash flow statement;

Identify the concerns of managers in delegating;

Identify the different internal and external users;

Identify the different planning and operational variances;

Identify the different sources of financial information;

Identify the key elements of published reports and accounts and explain each;

Explain the following aspects of ratio analysis: Profitability; Efficiency and performance; Liquidity; Investment; Cash flow; The DuPont system;

Identify the linkages between ABM and ABC;

Identify the possible uncertainty and risk in budgeting and planning;

Identify the role expectations of social support;

Identify the set of complimentary relationship in every role;

Identify the single and mixed products;

Identify the stages and flow of cost in activity-based costing (ABC);

Identify the standard costs of a company;

Identify who are the users of accounting and financial information;

Illustrate a matrix organisational structure;

Illustrate a simple, functional and divisional organisational structure;

Illustrate the difference between the hard approach to HRM and Soft approach to HRM;

Illustrate, vividly, how the Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Environmental and Legal (PESTEL) Factors impinge on Employee Resourcing, incorporating Human Resource Planning;

Indicate the significant aspects in the Development of Personnel Management and Human Resource Management;

Explain the budget process, including activity-based budgeting;

Enumerate the degree of specificity of role in mechanistic organisations and organismic organisations;

Illustrate the importance of delegation in increasing productivity and workflow;

Narrate the importance of lines of authority and accountability in organisations towards effective organisation communication;

Determine the information contained in the balance sheet pertaining to the company;

Explain, with suitable examples, the organisation’s accountability to owners or sponsors, clients, users, or customers, creditors, and sector or industry;

Demonstrate their knowledge of organisational and accounting control systems;

Illustrate how to delegate authority for effective task performance;

Suggest how to delegate responsibility with delegated tasks;

Explain how to develop competitive advantage;

Demonstrate their ability to perform break-even analysis;

Demonstrate their ability to predict business failure using the ALTMAN z-score;

Link Employee Resourcing with Business and Organisational Development;

Link resources, activities and management;

List some structural typologies and describe each;

Locate Performance Management in an appropriate context;

Manage the risk of internal ‘sabotage’;

Manage the strategic role:

Name the three major influences on pricing decisions;

Outline the activity-based budgeting process;

Perform a risk analysis;

Peruse business objectives through business objectives;

Prepare a cash flow statement for their company;

Provide a working definition of accountability

Realise the value of standard costing as a management tool;

Relate the part played by Rowntree in the development of personal management and human resource management;

Specify the limitations of the conventional balance sheet;

Specify the new role for managers and accountants.

Suggest solutions to some problems in budgeting;

Suggest the importance of Human Resource Planning in Organisation Management;

Suggest ways to improve organisational culture.

Suggest ways to integrate continuous improvement into variance analysis;

Demonstrate their understanding of organisational structure as roles and relationships;

Demonstrate their understanding of the concept of internal selection mechanism;

Demonstrate their understanding of the principle of profit and profitability;

Demonstrate their understanding of the principle of transfer pricing;

Demonstrate their understanding of d the time value of money;

Utilise the sensitivity analysis in decision-making to overcome risk and uncertainty;

Utilise the sensitivity analysis in decision-making to overcome risk and uncertainty.

  

Programme Contents, Concepts, and Issues

Module 1

M1. Part 1: Contextualising Organisational Analysis

Organisations: A Definition;

Formal and Informal Organisations: A Distinction;

Organisational Task and Task Groupings;

Business vs. Non-business Organisations;

Objectives Defined;

Social Objectives;

Business Objectives;

Perusing Business Objectives through Business Objectives;

Profitability of Social Objectives:

Direct Gains;

Indirect gains;

Division of Work or Labour;

Delegation;

Responsibility;

Accountability;

Authority Demythified;

Authority - Facet #1;

Authority  - Facet #2;

Power.

 

 

 

M1. Part 2: Delegation as an Operational Imperative

A Working Definition of Delegation;

The Concept of ‘Leasing’;

Why Delegate?;

How Managers Benefit from Delegating;

How Subordinates Benefits from Being the Recipient of a Delegated Task;

Managerial Concerns about Delegating;

Delegating Authority for  Effective Task Performance;

Delegating Responsibility with Delegated Task;

Factors Influencing Effective Delegation;

Delegation in a Time Management Context.

 

 

 

M1. Part 3: Contextualising Delegation

Delegation as Internal Promotion;

Informal Management Succession Charts;

Formal Management Succession Charts;

Internal Selection Mechanism;

Delegation and External Candidature;

Authority: Facets #1 and 2 Contextualised.

 

 

 

M1. Part 4: Role in an Organisational Context

Role: A Definition;

The ‘Role Set’;

Role and Role Relationships;

Exemplifying Roles;

The Role Actor or Incumbent;

Role Perception;

Incumbent’s Role Perception;

Individual’s Role Perception;

Role and the External Environment;

Role and the Internal Environment;

Defining the Role Set;

Role Segments;

The Relationship between an Incumbent’s Experience and Role Enactment;

The Relationship between an Incumbent’s Role Perception and His or Her Role Performance;

The Place of an Incumbent’s Perceived Role Expectations on His or Her Role Enactment;

Segmental Expectations;

The Role as the Behavioural Expectations of a Role Set;

The Boundary Relationship of a Role Set;

Role Expectations of Social Support;

The Democratic Incumbent;

The Autocratic Incumbent;

The Generous Incumbent;

The Dedicated Incumbent;

The Social Self;

Self-Ideal as a Behavioural Construct;

Self-Ideal and a Performance Enhancer.

 

 

 

M1. Part 5: The Organisation’s Internal and External Accountability

Internal Organisational Accountability;

Upward Organisational Accountability;

Downward Organisational Accountability;

The Risk of Internal ‘Sabotage’;

External Organisational Accountability;

Accountability to Owners or Sponsors;

Accountability to Clients, Users, or Customers;

Accountability to Creditors;

Accountability to Sector or Industry.

 

 

 

M1. Part 6: Organisational Design Metaphors and Relationships

Organisational Structure as Roles and Relationships;

Lines of Authority and Accountability in Organisations;

Unitary Command System: Classical Organisational Theory and Design;

Dual and Multiple Command Systems: Towards Neo-Classical, Humanistic and Contingency Organisational Design Approaches;

Operational Centralisation;

Operational Decentralisation;

Bureaucratic Organisations;

Adhocratic Organisations;

Mechanistic Organisations;

Organismic Organisations;

Single Status Organisations;

Dual Status Organisations;

Role Specificity in Mechanistic Organisations;

Role Specificity in Organismic Organisations;

Managerial Control vs. Worker Autonomy and Professionalism in Mechanistic Organisations;

Managerial Control vs. Worker Autonomy and Professionalism in Organismic Organisations;

Structural Typologies;

The Simple Organisational Structure;

Snippet of Functional Organisational Structure;

Snippet of Divisional Structure;

Bases of Divisional Organisational Structure;

Snippet of Matrix Organisational Structure;

Matrix Organisational Types.

 

 

 

M1. Part 7: Understanding Organisational Culture

Concept of Organisational Culture;

Cultural Classification:

Role Culture;

Task Culture;

Power Culture.

The Relationship between Power, Culture and Organisational Structure;

Culture and Managerial Action;

Organisational Culture Improvement.

 

 

 

M1. Part 8: From Personnel to Human Resource Management: A Strategic Development

A Distinction between Personnel Management and Human Resource Management;

The advent of Welfare Management;

The role of Joseph Rowntree in Industrial Welfare Development;

The Development of Professional Personnel and Human Resource Management;

Concerns of Personnel Management:

Recruitment and Selection;

Workers’ Welfare and Benefits;

Industrial Relations;

Staff Appraisal;

Training and Development.

The strategic significance of Human Resource Management;

Concerns of Human Resource Management:

Recruitment;

Selection;

Motivation;

Human Resource Planning;

Workforce Management Strategy;

Flexible Working Strategy

 

 

 

M1.  Part 9: Human Resource Management As A Strategic Tool

The rationale for Human Resource Planning (HRP);

The link between HRP and Corporate Planning;

Human Resource Forecasting (HRF);

Designing, implementing and reviewing the effectiveness of HRP;

The role of Employee Resourcing in Corporate Strategies and Goals;

The role of internal and stakeholders in the Employee Resourcing process;

Emergent and Contingency Approaches to Employee Resourcing;

The role of Employee Resourcing in Business and Subsystem Strategy;

The role of Employee Resourcing in the Development of Organisational Strategy;

Organisational Strategy and Employee Resourcing Strategy Compatibility.

 

 

 

M1. Part 10: Strategising Employee Resourcing (1)

Logicalising Internal and External Selection Processes;

Internal and External Selection Processes as an Organisational Development Phenomena;

Rationalising Internal Selection as a Process;

Staff Turnover and its Negative and Positive Impact on the Organisation;

Recruitment and Selection as a Resourcing Activity;

The Importance of Human Resource Forecasts;

Methods of Forecasting Human Resource Needs of the Organisation;

The Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Environmental and Legal (PESTEL) Factors, in the External Uncontrollable Environment and how they impinge on Employee Resourcing, incorporating Human Resource Planning;

Strategic Operational Review’ (SOR) As Prerequisite for Human Resource Forecasting.

 

 

 

M1. Part 11: Strategising Employee Resourcing (2)

Importance of Human Resource Audit;

Conducting Human Resource Audit;

Personnel Deployment Chart (PDC);

Management Succession Chart (MSC);

Job Analysis;

Job Description;

Personnel Specification;

Market Targeting;

Designing and Placing Advertisement;

Designing a Candidate Assessment Form (CAF);

Weighting and Using a Candidate Assessment Form (CAF);

Non-Conventional Personnel Selection;

Short Listing Candidates;

Conducting Selection Interviews;

 

 

 

M1. Part 12: Motivation in Human Resource Management

Directing or Leading: Setting The Stage;

The Conceptual Bases of Motivation;

Theoretical Bases of Motivation: An Overview;

Distinguishing Between Knowledge and Skills;

Competence and Performance: A Conceptual Exploration;

Is there a Definitive Relationship between Competence and Motivation?

Content Theories and Some of Their Contributors:

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs;

Analysis of Maslow’s Claims;

McClelland's Studies;

Taylor: Money and Motivation;

Motivator-Hygiene Factor: Herzberg’s Contribution.

Process Theories;

Equity Theory;

Goal-Setting Theory;

Expectancy Theory;

Equitable Reward Systems;

Reinforcement Theories.

 

 

 

M1. Part 13: Contextualising Motivation in Human Resource Management

The Extent to Which Salary or Wages Inducement Motivate Workers;

Performance Related Pay (PRP);

Productivity Bonuses;

Efficiency Gains;

Profit Share;

Social Differentiation in Motivation;

Culture Differentiation in Motivation;

Wealth as a Factor in Motivation;

Class as an Issue in Motivation;

Individual Expectation and Motivation;

Individual Preferences as a Motivating Factor;

Designing an Effective Motivation Strategy.

 

 

 

M1. Part 14: Diversity Management and Its Importance in Human Resource Management

The Concepts of Equal Opportunities and Diversity Management;

Equal Opportunities in Employment and the British Legislation;

Exploring Workforce Diversity;

Cultural Diversity, Generally;

Gender Diversity;

Racial Diversity;

Ethnic Diversity

Age Diversity;

Perceptual and Mental Diversity;

Physical Diversity;

Sexuality Diversity;

Sentience as a Basis for Racial, Ethnic and Gender Discrimination;

Racial, Ethnic and Gender Discrimination: The Social Identity Perspective;

Gender and Sex Discrimination;

Age Discrimination (Ageism and Reverse Ageism);

Disability Discrimination;

Racial Discrimination;

Discrimination as Social Identity;

Understanding and Dealing with Sentience.

 

 

 

M1. Part 15: Diversity Management or Mismanagement: Organisational Enhancement or Catastrophe?

Diversity Mismanagement and Its Consequence for Organisational Survival: Some Case Examples;

Beyond Equal Opportunities: Towards Diversity Management;

Diversity Management and Effective Human Resource Utilization;

Constitution of Committees and Task Forces;

Gate Keeping: Avoiding ‘Resonation’;

Utilizing Marketing Intelligence;

Activities Necessary for an Effective Management of Organisational Diversity: Managing Organisational Culture;

Ensuring Human Resource Management System Is Bias Free;

Managing Diversity through Recruitment, Training, Education & Development;

Managing Diversity in Appraisal, Compensation and Benefits;

Promotion;

Creating a Higher Career Involvement of Women: Eliminating Dual Career Routes;

Managing Diversity through the Prevention of Subtle Sexual Harassment;

Managing Racial, Ethnic and Gender Diversity through the Elimination of the Opportunities for Discrimination That Are Created by the ‘Complaints System’;

Reducing Work-Family Conflict;

Promoting Heterogeneity in Race, Ethnicity, Nationality

Being Mindful of the Effect of Homogeneity on Cohesiveness and Groupthink;

Effective Diversity Management and Organisational Success;

Some Effective Diversity Initiatives;

Mummy Tracks;

Granny Crčche;

Employment of Older People;

Example of Organizations with Diversity-Enhanced Environments.

 

 

 

M1. Part 16: Project Management: Overview

Project Defined;

Distinction between Project and Task;

Project Classification;

Pre-Project Commissioning;

The Project Management Concept;

Pre-feasibility and Feasibility Studies;

Project Life Cycle;

Project Life Cycle Phases:

Project Initiation;

Project Planning;

Project Execution:

Project Evaluation.

Project Completion;

Project Commissioning.

Project Life Cycle Management;

Project Portfolio Management System;

Project Co-ordination;

Project Sustainability;

The Project Manager.

 

 

 

M1. Part 17: Project Initiation

Pre-feasibility and Feasibility Studies;

Pre-Project Commissioning;

Basic Steps of the Project Initiation Phase;

Using Project Selection Models/Methods:

Criteria for Choosing Project Selection Models;

Nature of Project Selection Models;

Nonnumeric:

The Sacred Cow;

The Operating Necessity;

The Competitive Necessity;

The Product Line Extension;

Comparative Benefit Model.

Numeric:

Payback Period;

Average Rate of Return;

Discounted Cash Flow/Net Present Value Method;

Internal Rate of Return;

Profitability Index.

Critical Factors to Ensure your Project is Successful:

Project Initiation Document:

The Project Charter;

The Project Mandate;

Other Project Initiation Documents.

Identifying and Performing Stakeholder Analysis.

 

 

 

M1. Part 18: Project Planning Process

Defining the Project Scope:

Project Objectives;

Deliverables;

Milestones;

Technical Requirements;

Limits and Exclusions;

Reviews with Customers.

Project Priority;

The Triple Constraints;

Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)

Process Breakdown Structure.

 

 

 

M1. Part 19: Project Execution and Control

Managing Personalities in Teams;

Effective Team-Work;

Managing the Team:

Running Effective Meetings;

Working with Geographically Remote People and Groups.

Management and Leadership in Project Environments:

The Role of Leadership and Management in Projects;

Individual Skills and Attitudes;

Individual Motivation;

Structural Implications for Project Managers;

Cultural Implication for Project Managers;

Management Style;

The Development of Management Thinking;

The Development of New Management Paradigm.

 

 

 

M1. Part 20: Project Monitoring and Evaluation

Introduction to Project Monitoring;

Monitoring Mechanisms;

Monitoring tools;

Participatory Monitoring;

Steps to Participatory Monitoring Techniques;

The Purpose of Project Monitoring and Evaluation;

Key Principles of Project Monitoring and Evaluation;

Critical Success Factors of Project Monitoring and Evaluation;

Project Audit;

Types of Project Audit;

Contents of the Project Audit.

 

 

 

M1. Part 21: Project Termination or Closure

Appropriate Project Termination Activities;

Activities in Closeout Phase;

Reasons for Stopping in Mid-Stream;

Early Termination Analyses;

Modes of Project Closure/Termination;

Project Disposition Phase;

The Objective of Project Disposition Phase;

Roles and Responsibilities During the Disposition Phase;

Deliverables During the Disposition Phase;

Final Project Report;

Mid-Term Evaluation Report: Sample Outline;

Annual Programme/Project Report.

 

 

 

M1. Part 22: Management and Cost Management Fundamentals: A Review of Key Cost Concepts

The Accountant’s Role in the Organization;

An Introduction to Cost Terms and Purposes;

The Use of Cost Management Information;

Creating Cost-Aware Organizations ;

Review of Some Key Cost Concepts;

Product vs. Period Costs;

Direct and Indirect Costs;

Cost Behaviour: Fixed and Variable Costs;

Problems and Examples.

 

 

 

M1. Part 23: Different Approaches to Costing (1)

Absorption (Full) vs. Variable Costing;

Under-Costing and Over-Costing: The Consequences For Profitability;

How to Refine a Costing System?;

Activity-Based Costing (ABC) and Cost-Management;

Cost Hierarchy and Cost Drivers;

Linking Resources, Activities and Management;

Introducing Activity-Based Management (ABM);

Linkages between ABM and ABC – Monitoring Value Creation;

Problems, Case Study and Examples.

 

 

 

M1. Part 24: Cost Planning and Pricing Decisions: Life – Cycle – Costing, Target Costing and Target Pricing

Linking Process Development to Costing;

Target Costing, Target Pricing and Its Implications;

The Three Major Influences on Pricing Decisions;

Distinguish Between Cost Incurrence and Locked-In Costs;

Cost plus Approach to Pricing;

Life Cycle Product Budgeting and Costing To Assist In Pricing Decision;

Problems, Case Study and Example.

 

 

 

M1. Part 25: A Strategic View of the Business Environment (1)

The Accounting Environment

The Uses and Purpose of Accounting;

Users of Accounting and Financial Information;

Various Groups of Stakeholders: Internal and External Users;

Accounting Language and Terminology;

Cash versus Profit, Accruals and Monetary Concepts;

Profit and Profitability;

Accounting Reports and Statements.

 

 

M1. Part 26: A Strategic View of the Business Environment (2)

Statement 1: The Balance Sheet – The Financial Position

The Structure of the Balance Sheet;

What Does the Balance Sheet Tell Us About the Company?

Limitations of the Conventional Balance Sheet.

 

Statement 2: The Profit and Loss Account (Income Statement) – Financial Performance

What Is Profit?;

The Structure of the Profit and Loss Account;

What Does the Profit and Loss Account Tell Us About the Company?

The Links between the Profit and Loss Account and Balance Sheet.

 

 

 

M1. Part 27: The Financial Statements and Financial Analysis

Statement 3: The Cash Flow Statement – Financial Flow

Cash vs. Profit;

What Is Included in The Cash Flow Statement?

Why Is Cash Flow So Important?

The Structure of the Cash Flow Statement;

The Links between Three Accounting Statements: The Cash Flow Statement, Profit and Loss;

Account and Balance Sheet.

 

The Annual Report and Financial Analysis

The Key Elements of Published Reports and Accounts;

Ratio Analysis: Profitability; Efficiency and Performance; Liquidity; Investment; Cash Flow; the DuPont System;

Cash vs. Profit as a Measure of Performance, EBITDA;

Predicting Business Failure – The Altman Z-Score;

Sources of Financial Information;

The Use of Non-Financial Information Together With Financial Information.

 

 

 

M1. Part 28: Budgeting and Short-term Planning

Break-Even Analysis: Cost/Volume/Profit Analysis

Cost/Volume/Profit (CVP) Relationships;

Break-Even Analysis;

Single And Mixed Products;

The Impact of Cost Structure Changes;

Limitations of CVP Analysis.

Budgeting

Purposes of Budgeting;

The Budget Process, Including Activity Based Budgeting;

Uncertainty and Risk – Worst and Best Outcomes;

Motivation and the Behavioural Aspects of Budgeting;

Problems in Budgeting.

 

 

M1. Part 29: Budgetary Control, and Long-Term Planning DCF and Capital Investment Appraisal

Capital Investment Decisions

What Is an Investment?

Investment Appraisal Criteria and Investment Decisions;

Time Value of Money;

Free Cash Flows;

Capital Rationing and Control of Capital Investment Projects;

Risk and Uncertainty and Decision-Making – Sensitivity Analysis.

Budgetary Control

 

Organisational and Accounting Control Systems;

Standard Costing;

Flexed Budgets and Variance Analysis;

Types of Variances and the Reasons They Occur;

Planning and Operational Variances.

 

 

M1. Part 30: Financing the Business and Strategic Accounting

Internal and External Sources of Finance 

Financing the Business:

Sources of Finance;

Gearing;

Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC);

Cost of Debt and Equity Capital;

Risk Analysis and CAPM.

Strategic Accounting:

Outline of Strategic Management Accounting;

Competitor Information and Strategic Positioning;

Competitive Advantage;

Strategic Accounting Systems, and the Balanced Scorecard.

New Role for Managers and Accountants.

 

 

M1. Part 31: A Strategic View of the Business Environment (1)

The Accounting Environment

The Uses and Purpose of Accounting;

Users of Accounting and Financial Information;

Various Groups of Stakeholders: Internal and External Users;

Accounting Language and Terminology;

Cash versus Profit, Accruals and Monetary Concepts;

Profit and Profitability;

Accounting Reports and Statements.

 

 

M1. Part 32: A Strategic View of the Business Environment (2)

Statement 1: The Balance Sheet – The Financial Position

The Structure of the Balance Sheet;

What Does the Balance Sheet Tell Us About the Company?

Limitations of the Conventional Balance Sheet.

 

Statement 2: The Profit and Loss Account (Income Statement) – Financial Performance

What Is Profit?;

The Structure of the Profit and Loss Account;

What Does the Profit and Loss Account Tell Us About the Company?

The Links between the Profit and Loss Account and Balance Sheet.

 

 

 

M1. Part 33: The Financial Statements and Financial Analysis

Statement 3: The Cash Flow Statement – Financial Flow

Cash vs. Profit;

What Is Included in The Cash Flow Statement?

Why Is Cash Flow So Important?

The Structure of the Cash Flow Statement;

The Links between Three Accounting Statements: The Cash Flow Statement, Profit and Loss;

Account and Balance Sheet.

 

The Annual Report and Financial Analysis

The Key Elements of Published Reports and Accounts;

Ratio Analysis: Profitability; Efficiency and Performance; Liquidity; Investment; Cash Flow; the DuPont System;

Cash vs. Profit as a Measure of Performance, EBITDA;

Predicting Business Failure – The Altman Z-Score;

Sources of Financial Information;

The Use of Non-Financial Information Together With Financial Information.

 

 

 

M1. Part 34: Budgeting and Short-term Planning

Break-Even Analysis: Cost/Volume/Profit Analysis

Cost/Volume/Profit (CVP) Relationships;

Break-Even Analysis;

Single And Mixed Products;

The Impact of Cost Structure Changes;

Limitations of CVP Analysis.

Budgeting

Purposes of Budgeting;

The Budget Process, Including Activity Based Budgeting;

Uncertainty and Risk – Worst and Best Outcomes;

Motivation and the Behavioural Aspects of Budgeting;

Problems in Budgeting.

 

 

 

M1. Part 35: Budgetary Control, and Long-Term Planning DCF and Capital Investment Appraisal

Capital Investment Decisions

What Is an Investment?

Investment Appraisal Criteria and Investment Decisions;

Time Value of Money;

Free Cash Flows;

Capital Rationing and Control of Capital Investment Projects;

Risk and Uncertainty and Decision-Making – Sensitivity Analysis.

Budgetary Control

 

Organisational and Accounting Control Systems;

Standard Costing;

Flexed Budgets and Variance Analysis;

Types of Variances and the Reasons They Occur;

Planning and Operational Variances.

 

 

M1. Part 36: Financing the Business and Strategic Accounting

Internal and External Sources of Finance

Financing the Business:

Sources of Finance;

Gearing;

Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC);

Cost of Debt and Equity Capital;

Risk Analysis and CAPM.

Strategic Accounting:

Outline of Strategic Management Accounting;

Competitor Information and Strategic Positioning;

Competitive Advantage;

Strategic Accounting Systems, and the Balanced Scorecard.

New Role for Managers and Accountants.

 

Business Management Programme, Leading to Postgraduate Diploma in Business Management

Module 2:

 Leading To Postgraduate Certificate in Business Management 2.

For Whom This Programme is Designed

This Programme is Designed For:

 All others desirous of gaining the needed expertise in training and development.

All others interested in ensuring that there is a high rate of return on Marketing Investment.

All others, desirous of managing the change process effectively.

Anyone who wants to build expertise in organizational design and change management;

Assistant Vice Chancellor for Advancement;

Board of Directors;

Brand Managers;

Client Service Managers;

Consultants;

Corporate Administration Advisor;

Corporate Directors;

Corporate Managers;

Customer Service Managers;

Department Heads;

Development Training Coordinator;

Director of Leadership, Services and Consulting;

Director, Executive and Leadership Development;

Director, Strategic Business Improvements;

Divisional Directors;

Entrepreneurs;

Executive and Management Development Directors;

Executive Managers;

External Change Agents;

HR Leader, Global HR Leadership Development;

Human Resource Managers;

Human Resource Personnel;

Human Resource Professionals;

Individuals with a genuine interest in Issues associated with Organisational Management.

Internal Change Agents;

Internal Corporate Consultant;

Junior Managers;

Lead Employees who need to excel at designing, developing, and delivering successful training programmes;

Learning and Development Facilitator;

Learning and Organizational Effectiveness Manager;

Life Cycle Specialists;

Line Managers and Design Teams;

Management Graduates;

Management Lecturers;

Manager, Global Organizational and Leadership Development;

Managing Director, Teacher Leadership Development;

Marketing Consultant;

Marketing Executives;

Marketing Lecturers;

Marketing Researchers;

Middle Managers;

Organisational Change Agents;

Organisational Development (OD) Professionals and Practitioners;

Organisational Development Practitioners;

Performance Consultants;

Product Designers;

Professional Development Manager;

Project Management Team Lead;

Relationship Managers;

Sales Executives;

Sales Managers;

Senior Managers;

Specialist, Professional Learning;

Supervisors;

Supervisors;

Talent Development and Learning Specialist;

Team Leaders – Materials Management;

Team Leaders;

Training and Development Specialists;

Training and Quality Assurance Coordinator;

Training Specialists;

Vice Provost, Faculty Affairs;

Vulnerability Management Team Lead.

 

 

 

Course Objectives

By the conclusion of the specified learning and development activities, delegates will be able to:

Appreciate the difference between individual stress tolerance levels;

Appreciate the importance of change institutionalisation;

Appropriately define organisational structure;

Assess the impact of information and communications technologies (ICTs) on the change process;

Assess the importance of effective communication in successful Organisational Development and Change.

Assess the likely effect of power distance on the effectiveness of change communication, taking steps to create a favourable situation within the internal and external environments;

Be able to equip a training room for maximum impact and effectiveness, within organisational budget and other constraints;

Be aware of the taxonomy of educational objectives and translate these into individual capability and achievements;

Be capable of designing evaluation questionnaire for individual courses, training programmes, and presenters;

Be conversant with the theories of learning and memory crucial to the development and implementation of training programmes;

Be equipped with the immediate and future training and development needs;

Chart the value of influence and rational empirical change strategies in ensuring worker comment to the change process;

Demonstrate a positive perception of the value of a learning organisation to co-operate effectiveness;

Demonstrate an awareness of the fundamental issues associated with Organisational design and their implications for effective organisational functioning;

Demonstrate an understanding of organisational climate and how it can be gauged;

Demonstrate an understanding of organisational development as a process;

Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of inter-personal skills in the continuing performance of autonomous work teams;

Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between high performance teams and ‘Risky;

Demonstrate and understanding of the place of equity in the functioning of high productivity teams;

Demonstrate exceptional leadership in the management of the learning environment;

Demonstrate leadership in the implementation of change, whilst avoiding whilst avoiding human and organisational casualties;

Demonstrate the ability to place equity in the context of organisational reward;

Demonstrate the need for a proactive stance in relation to organisational change;

Demonstrate their ability to conduct an internal environmental analysis-SW;

Demonstrate their ability to conduct individual, team and organisational training needs analysis;

Demonstrate their ability to encourage the type of superior-subordinate relationship which will be conducive to organisational success;

Demonstrate their ability to incorporate specified elements of the quality of working life in the management of their subsystems and sections;

Demonstrate their ability to prepare for and make effective oral presentations;

Demonstrate their awareness of change management and human resource implications;

Demonstrate their awareness of the inevitability of organisational   change;

Demonstrate their understanding of at least 2 approaches to leadership;

Demonstrate their understanding of the High and Low LPC Leaders’ degree of behavioral control over their subordinates, respectively;

Demonstrate their understanding of the relationship between fielder’s situational model & McGregor’s Theory ‘X’ & Theory ‘Y’ leadership styles;

Demonstrate your understanding of the social and psychological relevance of the stages of formation of a group;

Design a strategy for the initiation development launching empowerment and support of high-performance teams in their organizations;

Design an organisation adhering to the principles of horizontal and vertical relationship;

Design appropriate assessments and assessment strategy of award-bearing components of training programmes;

Design appropriate delegate activities relevant to the stated learning objectives;

Design appropriate in-course evaluation;

Design courses that account for individual training needs and learning curve;

Design learning experiences that will ensure that learning;

Design learning objectives, mindful of what can be realistically achieved - in terms of the experience and motivation of delegates;

Design measures, which will ensure change institutionalisation;

Determine organisational success factors;

Determine the different stages of process consultation;

Determine the factors, which contribute to workers’ resistance to change;

Determine the importance of training and development in the ‘culturing’ of high-performance teams;

Determine the key role that organisational change agent play in driving the process forward;

Determine the most appropriate Organisational Change strategy that should be employed in particular change and organisational contexts;

Determine the most appropriate way to organise training and development courses;

Determine the most effective ways of communicating change decisions to workers;

Determine the situations when a particular approach might be appropriate;

Determine the situations, in specific relation to scale, level, cost, urgency (both proactive and reactive), where a particular approach might be appropriate;

Determine the type, level and stage of change that might be best suited to the ‘employment’ of internal or external change agents, respectively, maintaining an effective working environment;

Determine ways of reducing latency in organisational change process;

Determine when change acceleration is necessary;

Determine when training intervention is necessary;

Develop an awareness of the relationship between organisational structure and leader and organisational flexibility;

Devise a strategy that will reduce the negative effects of ‘change acceleration’;

Devise methods of reducing stress levels;

Discuss the co-ordinating mechanism in a simple structure;

Discuss the positive effect of high-performance teams to the enhancement of ‘Organisational Learning’ and ‘Learning Organisation’;

Distinguish between change strategies and approaches to change;

Distinguish between different organisational structures;

Distinguish between groups and mere aggregations;

Distinguish between organismic and mechanistic structures;

Distinguish between strategic and operational change;

Distinguish between task forces, committees, command groups and boards;

Distinguish between the basic types of structure;

Distinguish between the concepts of ‘leader’ and ‘managerial leader’;

Distinguish between the different types of matrix structures;

Distinguish between the speed of change and ‘change acceleration’;

Effectively manage a training department;

Effectively manage commissioning relationships; and

Effectively structure training courses to incorporate formal presentations, delegate activities and evaluation;

Employ the correct change strategy that will create ‘winners’ even in a ‘most hopeless’ situation;

Establish the symbiotic relationship between Organisational Development and Organisational Change;

Exhibit a heightened awareness of the constituents of organisational development;

Exhibit their ability to conduct an external environmental analysis;

Exhibit their ability to use aspects of quality of working life to motivate workers;

Explain ‘Person’ or ‘Consideration Oriented’ leaders and their relationship with employee satisfaction and subsequent staff turnover level Point to specific empirical research supporting the relationship between participative leadership behaviour and organisational effectiveness.

Explain the approaches to organisational design;

Explain the motivation behind the excellence of high-performance teams;

Explain the relationship between the ‘goal-path model’ of leadership & the expectancy theory of motivation;

Exploit the benefits of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in the planning, communication and implementation of change, being mindful of their drawbacks;

Identify an organisational structure from verbal description;

Identify horizontal relationships in organisational design;

Illustrate communication channels in an organisational chart;

Illustrate how the issue of added value might be instilled by high performance teams;

Illustrate how their organisations can benefit from high performance teams;

Illustrate lines of authority in an organisational chart;

Illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of each change strategy;

Illustrate the advantages and drawbacks of group involvement in decisions related to change;

Illustrate the effect of organisational structure on communication within an organisation;

Illustrate the importance of members’ understanding of team dynamics for effecting their team building and maintenance roles;

Illustrate the role of the internal and external Organisational Development Consultant (OD) in supporting the development maintenance and crisis management of high-performance teams;

Illustrate the value of high-performance teams in enhancing organisational development;

Illustrate their ability to design an appropriate organisational structure that takes account of contingent internal and external environmental factors;

Implement change, whilst avoiding human and organisational casualties;

Incorporate appropriate 'Ice-breaker' and 'Closure' activities that will enhance the effectiveness of individual training courses;

Indicate the function of communication as a medium of the transmission of values and role relationships in autonomous work teams;

Indicate the importance of vertical and horizontal relationships in organisational design;

Link organisational and subsystem business strategy to training and development strategy;

List the different stages of operational control;

Manage latent and manifest resistance to change;

Manage Sensitivity Training successfully;

Manage the relationship between the organisation and its internal and external stakeholders during the different stages of the change process;

Match the mode, channel and method of communication with the nature and stage of the change process;

Match the organisational design approach with the level of development of the organisation;

Meet the objectives - taking account of relevant factors associated with established principles of learning;

Name the fundamental organisational structures and their variations;

Plot the relationship between managers with high & low least preferred co-worker (LPC), characteristics, respectively;

Position the training department within organisational corporate structure;

Provide at least three alternative phrases for the concept of high-performance teams;

Provide examples of different bases of divisional structure;

Provide the bases for structural contingencies;

Recommend the most appropriate structure for an organisation, taking contingent factors into account;  

Show the vertical relationships in an organisational chart;

Strike a balance between macro-organisational development and micro-organisational development;

Suggest how effective conflict management might enhance the lifespan of high productivity teams;

Suggest how informal groups might be empowered to enhance organisational effectiveness.

Suggest problems with equalities or traits approaches;

Suggest the approaches which might be adopted in designing an organisation;

Suggest the degree to which leadership styles plays a part in affecting the success or failure of the change process;

Suggest the difference in interpretation of groups and teams;

Suggest the efforts, which an organisation might employ to reduce workers’ resistance to change;

Suggest the most appropriate operational stage that is supportive of the continuance of high productivity in high performance teams;

Synthesize the relationship between internal and external environmental analyses-SWOT;

Take steps to create a positive perception of the organisation, among shareholders, funding agents, clients and customers, during a strategic change process;

Translate the positive and negative factors of particular types of structure to the design of an organisation which will enhance the effectiveness of an enterprise;

Use case examples to illustrate the need for culturing the appropriate leadership styles and strategies that are conducive to the sustainability of high-performance teams in their organizations;

Use different internal sources of information to assess.

 

 

Programme Contents, Concepts, and Issues

 

M2. Part 1: Marketing: Creating and Capturing Customer Value

Defining and Deconstructing Marketing;

Understanding the Marketplace and Customer Needs;

Designing a Customer-Driven Marketing Strategy;

Preparing an Integrated Marketing Plan and Program;

Building Customer Relationships;

Capturing Value from Customers;

The Changing Marketing Landscape.

 

 

M2. Part 2: Company and Marketing Strategy: Partnering to Build Customer Relationships

Companywide Strategic Planning: Defining Marketing’s Role;

Designing the Business Portfolio;

Planning Marketing: Partnering to Build Customer;

Relationships;

Marketing Strategy and the Marketing Mix;

Managing the Marketing Effort;

Measuring and Managing Return on Marketing Investment.

 

 

M2. Part 3: Analysing the Marketing Environment

The Company’s Microenvironment;

The Company’s Macro-environment;

Demographic Environment;

Economic Environment;

Natural Environment;

Technological Environment;

Political and Social Environment;

Cultural Environment;

Responding to the Marketing Environment.

 

 

M2. Part 4: Managing Marketing Information to Gain Customer Insights

Marketing Information and Customer Insights;

Assessing Marketing Information Needs;

Developing Marketing Information;

Marketing Research;

Analyzing and Using Marketing Information;

Other Marketing Information Considerations.

 

 

M2. Part 5: Understanding Consumer and Business Buyer Behaviour

Consumer Markets and Consumer Buyer Behavior;

Model of Consumer Behavior;

Characteristics Affecting Consumer Behavior;

The Buyer Decision Process;

The Buyer Decision Process for New Products;

Business Markets and Business Buyer Behavior;

Business Markets;

Business Buyer Behavior;

The Business Buying Process;

E-Procurement.

 

 

M2. Part 6: Customer-Driven Marketing Strategy: Creating Value for Target Customers

Customer-Driven Marketing Strategy;

Market Segmentation;

Market Targeting;

Differentiation and Positioning.

 

 

M2. Part 7: Products, Services, Brands, and Customer Value: Managing Product Life Cycle

What is a Product?;

Product and Service Decisions;

Services Marketing;

Branding Strategy: Building Strong Brands.

New-Product Development Strategy;

The New-Product Development Process;

Managing New-Product Development;

Product Life-Cycle Strategies;

Product Decisions and Social Responsibility;

International Product and Services Marketing.

 

 

M2. Part 8 - Organisational Development: Salient Issues

What is Organisational Development?

OD and Organisational Effectiveness;

Differing Perspectives of Organisational Development;

Organisational Climate;

Organisational Culture;

Organisational Norms;

Organisational Values;

Organisational Power Structure;

Worker Commitment;

Structure of Roles in Organisation;

Inter-Group Collaboration;

The Combination of the Authority Based in Roles with the Authority Based in Knowledge and Skills;

The Creation of an Open System of Communication –Vertically, Horizontally, Diagonally; Management Development.

 

 

M2. Part 9 - Micro and Macro Organisational Development: Their Respective Direct and Indirect Contribution to Organisational Improvement and Eventual Effectiveness (1)

Micro Organisational Development;

The Quality of Working Life;

Aspects of Quality of Working Life;

Adequate and Fair Compensation;

Healthy and Safe Working Conditions;

Development and Growth of Human Capacities;

Growth and Security;

Social Integration of People;

Constitutionalism.

 

 

 

M2. Part 10 - Micro and Macro Organisational Development: Their Respective Direct and Indirect Contribution to Organisational Improvement and Eventual Effectiveness (2)

Protection of Total Life Space;

Social Relevance of Work;

Sensitivity Training;

Approach to Organisational Development;

Organisational Development Interventions;

Process Consultation;

Enhancing the Effectiveness of Programmes;

Macro Organisational Development:  Organisation-wide Development and Change

Determination of organisational Development Success.

 

 

M2. Part 11 - Contextualising the Organisational Change Management Process (1)

Influence Change Strategies: When They Should be Used or Avoided;

Control Change Strategies: When They Should Be Used or Avoided;

Communicating Organisational Change;

Communication Media: Mass or Personalised Communication?

Mode and Channels of Communication;

Getting the Message Right;

Timing of Communication;

Who Should Communicate What, When?

Use of Groups in Change Process;

Managing Latent and Manifest Resistance to Change;

Effective, Overall Change Leadership.

 

 

M2. Part 12 - Contextualising the Organisational Change Management Process (2)

Leading Change Implementation;

Selecting the Appropriate Change Agent;

Internal or External;

Speed of Change;

Change Acceleration: Averting Organisational and Individual Casualties;

Confidence;

Change Tolerance and Individual Stress Levels;

Managing The External Environment: Improving Perception and Instilling;

Stakeholders, Generally;

Shareholders and Funding Agents;

Customers and Clients;

Potential Customers and Clients;

Change Institutionalisation: Returning to Normality.

 

 

M2. Part 13: Education, Training and Development

Education Defined;

General Education;

Specialist Education and Special Education.

Training Defined;

Development Defined;

Behavioural Objectives:

Learner;

Participant or Delegate;

Examples of Specific Behavioural Objectives.

Education, Training and Development as Organization Development:

Organizational Development Defined:

Emphasis and Concerns.

Organisational Effectiveness Defined.


 

 

M2. Part 14: Learning Theory

Learning Defined;

Factors Affecting Learning:

Learning Curve:

Definition;

Factors affecting individual learning progress:

Aptitude, Treatment Intervention (ATI):

Aptitude Defined;

ATI Defined;

Views of ATI:

Universalist View;

Contingency View.

Reinforcement Theory;

Levels of Learning:

The Learning Hierarchy

Simple Recall;

Comprehension;

Application;

Problem Solving;

Synthesis.

Other Related Factors:

Kolb’s Model;

Learning Approaches;

Learning & work motivation.

 

 

M2. Part 15: Learning & its Application to Organisations (1)

Bases of Learning Theories;

Examples of Learning Theories;

Classical Conditioning;

Operant Conditioning;

Instrumental Conditioning;

Learning Reinforcement;

Memory Acquisition;

Retention of Memory;

Memory Retrieval;

Skill Acquisition;

Inductive Learning.

Historical Contributions to Learning Theories:

Herman Ebbinghaus (1850 -1909)

Memory;

Retention Curve;

Negative Acceleration;

Learning Curve.

 

 

M2. Part 16: Learning & its Application to Organisations (2)

Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849 – 1938)

Classical Conditioning (US, UR, CS, CR);

Acquisition;

Conditioning Curve;

Extinction;

Spontaneous Recovery;

Temporal Ordering.

Edward Thorndike (1874 – 1949)

Instrumental Conditioning

Reinforcer;

Law of Effect;

Law of Exercise;

Principle of Belongingness.

Clark Hull(1884-1952)

Reaction Potential;

Habit Strength;

Drive;

Incentive Motivation;

Inhibition.

Edward Tolman (1886-1959)

Latent Learning;

Cognitive Map.

B. F. Skinner

Instrumental Conditioning or Operant Conditioning;

Free Operant;

Cumulative Response Record;

Scalloped Function.

Atkinson & Shiffrin

Short – Term Memory;

Rehearsal;

Long – Term Memory.

 

 

M2. Part 17: Role of Internal Trainer (1)

Identification of Individual and Organisational Training Needs;

Plan Training & Development Programmes;

Establish Training & Development Objectives;

Organise and Deliver Training Programme;

Liaise with External Training Consultants & Training & Educational Organisations;

Evaluate Effectiveness of Training Programme;

Recommend External Programs;

Recommend &, or, Commission Training Consultancy;

Identify Potential Internal Training Facilitators;

Engage in Internal Training Facilitators.

 

 

M2. Part 18: Role of Internal Trainer (2)

Evaluate effectiveness of Internal and External Training Consultants;

Evaluate effectiveness of Specific Training Activities;

Prepare other Trainers;

Manage the Training Environment;

Motivate Delegates & Potential Delegates;

Provide Consultation Service to Managers & other Individuals;

Devise & or Influence Training Policy;

Interpret & Adhere to Training Policy;

Ensure that Training is Related to Immediate and Long-Term Organisational Strategy;

Monitor the Training Operation;

Ensure that Training Standards are Established, Enforced & Monitored;

Ensure that Associated Administrative Functions are Effective.

 

 

M2. Part 19: Training Interventions

Formal Training Interventions:

Attributes and Methods;

Out-door Adventure;

Computer-based Training;

Programmed Interactive Learning;

Distance Learning;

Job Rotation and Job Shadowing: Formal or Informal?;

Coaching;

Incidental Learning;

Trial and Error;

Informal Observation;

Modelling Informal Mentors.

Application and Disadvantages.

 

 

M2. Part 20: Training Policy and Strategy

Training Policy Vs. Business Strategy;

Training Policy:

Matched with Specific Organisational Needs;

Response to Existing Organisational Ineffectiveness.

Linking Training Policy to Business Strategy:

The Element of Finite Resources;

Good Business Sense;

Enhancement of Organisational Objectives.

Other Arguments.

Education & Training for Personal Development:

Relation to Micro OD;

The Spin-off of Micro OD;

Policy: Aligned to Business Strategy;

Improved Effectiveness.

General Questions:

Contribution to Competitive Advantage or Improved Organisational Functioning;

Training and Unemployment.

 

M2. Part 21: Induction, Appraisal and Probation

Induction:

Definition;

Importance;

Formal Training;

Commitment:

Moral;

Remunerative;

Calculative.

Probationary Period:

Fixed Term;

Assessment;

Confirmation.

Performance Appraisal:

Types of Performance Appraisal

Ranking Scales;

Force Ranking;

Paired Comparison;

Self Appraisal;

Paired Comparison;

Self Appraisal;

Critical Incident;

Management by Objectives;

360 Degree Feedback.

 

 

M2. Part 22: Learning Organisation: An Introduction 

Learning Opportunity;

Circumvention of Formal Communication Channels;

Effective Technology – Based Communication System;

Effective Control System;

Component Supplier – Producer Collaboration;

Effective and Swift Environmental Response;

Flexible Reward System;

Effective Boundary Management;

General Organisational Development: Macro & Micro;

Efforts to Maintain & Improve Organisational Health.

 

M2. Part 23: Organisational Learning & Learning Organisation

Organisational Learning & Learning Organisation: A Distinction;

Implicit Learning & Tacit Knowledge:

Characteristics of Implicit & Tacit Knowledge.

Organisational Learning:

Organisation as Individuals;

Benefits;

Learning from One to Many or Many to One;

Social Learning;

Self Adjustment.

Individual & Organisational Learning;

Learning Organisation:

Acknowledges;

Facilitates;

Exploits.


 

 

M2. Part 24: Leadership and Managerial Leadership

The Concepts of ‘Leader’ and ‘Managerial Leader’;

The Leader and Authority;

The Leader and Influence;

The Manager and the Conferment of Power;

The Application of Control and ‘Power Cohesion’;

The ‘Managerial Leader’ and the Ability to Vary Strategy;

Power as Recourse of the Managerial Leader;

Leadership and Interpersonal Relationship;

Approaches to Leadership;

Qualities or Traits Approach To Leadership;

Task and Person Orientation;

Participative Leadership;

Transactional Leadership;

 

M2. Part 25: Executive Leadership and Performance

Transformational Leadership;

Contingency or Situational Approaches to Leadership;

Leaders vs. Non-Leaders In Relation To Confidence & Intelligence;

Leadership and Extroversion;

Problems with Traits Approach’;

Social, Power and Achievement Needs and Their Relevance to Leadership;

‘Task and Leader- Qualities Match’;

Perceived Consequence of Task Orientation and Reduced Relationship Orientation for Managerial Effectiveness;

The Consequence of Person or Consideration Oriented Leadership on Employee Satisfaction and Subsequent Staff Turnover;

Contingent Factors and Leader Effectiveness or Ineffectiveness;

Perceived Value of ‘Democratic Leader Behaviour’, Dispensing Participative Leadership;

Perceived Value of ‘Autocratic Leader Behaviour’;

 

M2. Part 26: Perception, Contingency, and Actualisation in Leadership

Value Of ‘Performance Monitoring’ To Individual Effectiveness;

Result Orientation Leadership vs. Process Oriented Leadership;

Transformational Leadership and Charisma;

Mission Progress Articulation;

Leading Through Delegation;

Subordinates’ Perception of Transformational Leadership vs. Transactional Leadership;

Contingency Approaches to Leadership and the Crucial Nature of an Organisation’s Environmental Variables;

Contingency Approaches vs. Universalist Approaches to Leadership;

Contingency Approaches to Leadership and Their Relationship to Trait and Style Orientations;

 

M2. Part 27: Executive Leader Development

Employee Development or Maturity and Its Relevance to Superior-Subordinate Relationships;

Superior-Subordinate Relationships as Leader Behaviour;

Superior-Subordinate Relationships as Control and Influence;

Superior-Subordinate Relationships as Power and Authority;

Least Preferred Co-Worker (LPC) – Low and High;

Characteristics of LPC Managers and Their Relationship to McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y;

Characteristics of Low LPC Managers and Their Relationship to Autocratic Leader Behaviour;

Characteristics of Low LPC Managers and Their Relationship with Theory X;

Characteristics of Low LPC Managers and Their Relationship to Task Control;

Characteristics of High LPC Managers and Their Relationship to McGregor’s Theory Y Leader;

Characteristics of High LPC Managers and Their Relationship To Permissive Leader Behaviour;

 

 

M2. Part 28: The High-Performance Leadership Game (1)

LPC Leaders and Their Relationship with Production Orientation;

LPC Leaders and Their Perception of the Behaviour That They Need to Exhibit to Achieve Productivity Improvement;

LPC Leaders and the Concept of ‘Power Distance’;

LPC Leaders and Their Emphasis on Meeting Targets;

LPC Leaders and the Level of Regard They Have For Superior-Subordinate Relationship;

Relevance of Situational Variables on Leader Behaviour:

Leader-Member Relation;

Task Structure;

Position Power.

Situational Variables and Expectancy Theory of Motivation.

 

 

M2. Part 29: The High-Performance Leadership Game (2)

High Performance Teams: A Definition;

Autonomous Work Teams;

Autonomous Work Groups;

Learning Groups;

Self-Directed Work-Teams/Groups;

Self-Managed Teams;

The Potential Energy of High-Performance Teams.

Instituting High-Performance Teams;

Empowering High-Performance Teams;

Inevitable Issues of Reward and Equity;

Internal and External Organisational Development (OD) Consultant’s Role in the Formation, Development, Support and Maintenance of High-Performance Teams.


 

 

M2. Part 30: Contextualising Organisational Structure

Defining Organisations

Social Organisations

Formal Organisations

Salient Elements of Organisational Analysis

Roles,  

Responsibilities,

Accountability,

Internal Accountability

Upward Accountability

Downward Accountability

The Organisation’s External Accountability

Accountability To Owners/Sponsors

Accountability To Clients/Users/Customers

Accountability To Creditors

Accountability To Sector Or Industry

Accountability To The State

Authority,

Traditional Authority

Charismatic Authority

Legitimate Authority

Professional Authority

Power

Organisational Power Sources

Authority

Control over resources

Control over information, access to and control over the information flow

Control over uncertainty

Unobtrusive Power

Delegation

Bases of Delegation;

Delegation and Professional Authority;

Delegation and Superior-Subordinate Relationship;

 

M2. Part 31: Organisational Design: Typologies and Principles

An Introduction to Organisational Design

Approaches to Organisational Design

Classical Organisational Design

Bases of Classical Organisational Design

Formal authority

Rules & regulations

Precedent for the establishment of future policy

Protagonists of the Classical Approach to organisational Design

Max Weber

Frederick Taylor

Henri Fayol

Neo-Classical Organisational Design

Protagonists of Neo-Classical Organisational Design

Douglas McGregor

Rensis Likert

Chris Argyris

Scientific Management to Organisational Design: Mechanistic Approach to Organisational Design

Human Relations Movement: Humanistic Approach to Organisational Design

Contingency Approaches to Organisational Design: Structure-Environment Match

Organisational Structure for a Stable Environment

Organisational Structure for Changing Environment

Organisational Structure for Turbulent Environment

Organisational Structure and Internal and External Relationships

Levels of Control and Role Specificity

Mechanistic and Organismic Structures and Their Types of Relationships

A Case In Point: The Mechanistic Factory Setting

 

M2. Part 32: Organisational Design Features

Vertical Relationships in Organisational Design

Horizontal Relationships in Organisational Design

Lines of Authority and Accountability in Organisational Design

Types of Organisational Structure

The Simple Structure

The Functional Structure

The Divisional Structure and Its Internal Relationships

Bases of Divisionalisation

Product Divisional Structure

Service Divisional Structure

Geographic or Regional Divisional Structure

The Matrix Structure

Divisional Matrix Structure

Functional Matrix Structure

Customised Matrices

The Divisional Structure Compared with the Functional Structure on the Basis of:

Communication,

Co-Ordination,

Worker Autonomy,

The Organisation of the Matrix Structure

Identifying and Designing Organisational Structures

 

 

M2. Part 33: Organisational Control, Communication and Decision-making in Matrix and Hierarchical Structures

Control as an Operational Necessity;

Control as a Co-ordinating Mechanism;

Bases of Co-ordinating;

Mutual Adjustment

Direct Supervision

Standardisation of Work Process

Standardisation of Output

Standardisation of Input

Structurally Derived Control System;

Importance Of Communication In Organisation

Corporate And Subsystem Needs

Programmes

Decisions

Problems

Emergencies And Contingencies

Individual, Subsystem And System Needs And Functions.

 

Barriers To Communication

Language

Cultural Differences

Power Distance

Emotion

 

 

M2. Part 34: Empirical Exploration of Organisational Control, Communication Pattern and Decision-making in Matrix and Hierarchical Structures

Organisational Control: Control Mechanism in the Matrix and Hierarchical Structures

Control Features in the Matrix Structure;

Control Mechanism in the Hierarchical Structures;

Decision-Making and Communication Patterns in Functional Structures;

Decision-Making and Communication Patterns in Divisional Structure;

Decision-Making and Communication Patterns in Matrix Structures;

The Interrelationship between Organisational Design and International Business;

The Place of the Divisional Structure in International Operations;

Communication In Organisation: The Problem Of Overload;

Organisation-wide communication as a feature of relationships:  The ability of the organisations to cope with these demands;

Written information in Matrix and Hierarchic Structures;

The use of meetings as a medium of communication and a system of management.

 

 

M2. Part 35: Organisational Structure and Flexibility: An Empirical Exploration

Two Elements of Organisational Flexibility:

Individual Autonomy;

Structurally Derived - Facilitating Response To Environment;

Factors That determine which organisational activities are established as organisational 'Customs' or 'Practices';  

Norms and Behavioural Expectations;

The Degree To Which Norms Specify How Organisational Activities Are To Be Conducted;

The Relationship Between The Type of Organisational Structure In Which Workers Operate, on The One Hand, and the Degrees of Autonomy Which They Have Over Organisational Activities, on The Other;

The Implication of Structurally Derived Autonomy For The Strategic Flexibility Of Organisations;

Is Organisation-Wide Flexibility - The Ability Of Corporate Managers To Deal, Swiftly, With Pertinent Issues - Is Structurally Related?;

Is Managerial Discretion - Freedom To Exercise Discretion In Decision-Making, While Maintaining Workers' Support - Is Structurally Enshrined?;

Structural Facilitation of Institutionalisation of Ideologies;

Ideological Growth and Flexibility Constraints;

Structural Imposition of Expectation for Consultation, when swift and decisive action is required;

Organisational Structure and Leadership Style: Maintenance of Desirable Superior-Subordinate Relationship;

The Concept of ‘Flexion’?

Staff deployment as an Issue for Structural Flexibility;

Structural Implications for Demand for Participation in Decision-making;

Structure-Cultural Infusion;

Matrix and Hierarchical Structures: Flexibility or Flexion.

 

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